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#1
David Medeiros

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The magazine I work with making route maps for overland travel articles is doing a re design, including the maps. The style seems to be shifting towards a more technical, operational, modern look.

 

I'm looking around for design inspiration along those lines and hoping you guys have some ideas to share. Send anything you have that you think fits the concept of technical or modern or even futuristic cartography.

 

At the scales of most of the story maps, the terrain is the main feature of interest so I'm looking to start there for a big style change. I'm especially interested in examples of alternate, non-natural elevation colors. Not bright fake hyspo colors though, mostly monochromatic, subdued colors. May try to go dark enough to drop lighter colored contours over the terrain to add some vector detail.

 

But anything you can think of for futuristic, technical, "black/ops", design ideas are welcome!

 

I'll post design my progress back to the board of course. Thanks all!

 

David


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#2
Kate Leroux

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I think some of these color palettes would make a great map: http://wesandersonpa...es.tumblr.com/ 



#3
Hans van der Maarel

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I think some of these color palettes would make a great map: http://wesandersonpa...es.tumblr.com/ 

 

Oooh, those are great, thanks for sharing! (I did edit your link by the way, it resolved to a 404 page)


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#4
david17tym

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Thanks for sharing Kate, my favourite film maker.

There's even a little cartography featured in Moonrise Kingdom... :)



#5
hasecbinusr

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Love the colors in this map! This reminds me of the New York Times' map-based information graphics. I've seen this style before, but I can't quite remember where right now. 



#6
Dennis McClendon

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I think I'd think in terms of what you see as "operational graphics" in shows like 24, Designated Survivor, Sherlock, or CSI.  I confess I only watch a couple of those, but they seem to lean on dark screens and crosshairs and white labels.

 

So I'd maybe emphasize a graticule, even one quite a bit finer than is needed, make colors as dark and deep as you dare, with slab-serif type.  Put aside the look we had to choose in the days of mediocre printing registration, and embrace the color choices and fine lines possible in computer screens.  I haven't, however, been able to think of any good way to keep shaded relief as part of such a look:

 

h9kqWja.png


  • J.G. and Kate Leroux like this
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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#7
J.G.

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Really like that design from Dennis.

Its going in my reference bucket.

Thanks for posting!


JG

 


#8
David Medeiros

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Yeah, it turns out we scraped shaded relief in favor of contours, but definitely following the fine light lines look over dark background. I'm planning to see if I can add back some elevation gradation with an unshaded hypso background, but at the moment they are happy with what we have.

 

I'm working on fonts now, I rely heavily on Myriad Pro for my work as it has a large number of typefaces to choose from for broad visual hierarchy. But may need to look for something slightly different, at least for the marginalia.

 

Will post some samples later.


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#9
Matthew Hampton

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This thread reminded me of a map I posted several years ago. It's something I would imagine seeing in a HUD on a Bourne film. Not too sure it's what you are after but it might provide a spark.

 

post-56-1291933081.jpg

 


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#10
David Medeiros

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You guys are nailing the overall aesthetic. Here's a sample of what we have for now. The main change here is on dropping the SR for a dark grey background with thin light grey contours. All other linework and labels are also being switched to light on dark but the hierarchy is still a work in progress. Also looking at updating the font for at least those labels in the bottom margin area. I'm staying away from the full on glow effect which looks more appropriate for on screen displays. These maps go into archival quality magazine print so wanted a slightly classier(?) look.

 

bbd8f547716adf14e73b6cbd64b17787.jpg


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#11
tangnar

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Looks really nice. I think you did fit the theme really well with this! 

 

I wonder if you could add a very slight shadow from the land, or a coastal vignette, to make the dark land raise up over the water a little. Not sure, but maybe?

 

Also, I wonder if you could use illuminated contours or something similar to add back in some relief. Again, maybe not necessary, just thinking... 



#12
Matthew Hampton

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My eyes want a few more visual hints to help determine the ground/water (mentioned above). The inset map flips things around and I loose a little footing. It looks really sharp!


co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#13
Dennis McClendon

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Oops.  I hope that was an early draft, because I'm pretty sure this is the "Great Australian Bite":

 

big_1900.jpg

 

 

I thought of suggesting contours, but they seem so retro nowadays, like printing grainy black-and-white pictures.  And once you get smaller than 1:100,000 or so, contours are pretty meaningless and hard to read.  I wanted to have contours as one of the four "relief" map treatments of Colorado on last year's NACIS program, but at that scale they're just a jumble of lines and all you can distinguish is mountainous vs. flat.

 

Ae3lPug.jpg


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#14
David Medeiros

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Yeah that's a concern for me as well. I'm intentionally keeping them near the bottom of the visual hierarchy to help. They are only a reference to elevation and mostly aesthetic at these scales (no labels or index contours) so I'm free to use any oddball interval that gets the best coverage. We'll see how it plays out in other areas. I've always been partial to the SR these maps used as that told most of the story about terrain traversed. The new maps need to evoke the overall re styling of the mag, and the contour vectors seems to work better than SR. I'm going to play with hypso only as well but this sample was a hit.


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#15
Hans van der Maarel

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Very nice map David!


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