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#1
Esther Mandeno

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Hello Everyone! (waves)

 

It's been a long time since I've visited, but of course I had a question that only you all can answer...

 

What are some new fonts you're using on your maps? Or do you still go with whatever it is you consider your standby? If so, what are those?

 

For my work, I often am asked to use Arial or something generic like that. But every now and then, when they don't ask, I sneak in Myriad Pro. But sometimes I just want to do a fun map and want to choose from a wider font set. I've used Typebrewer.org before, but that sticks to specific core fonts. Which, I suppose, are good and I should just pick from those? (FYI - it appears Typebrewer is offline at the moment. I hope they are able to update the site.)

 

I feel I've asked this question before, but new thoughts are always welcomed.

 

Cheers,

Esther


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Esther Mandeno
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#2
GeographyNerd

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I used to change fonts to be creative, but now I just stick with arial. The reason is that it is the default in ArcMap. Changing the font constantly is a total pain in the butt. I should look if there is a setting to change the default font, but I have never noticed a setting for it. 



#3
Hans van der Maarel

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For "street" maps, or other maps with lots of text, I tend to stick to Frutiger (because it has various weights available, especially 55 Roman and 57 Condensed see a lot of use on my maps) and sometimes Univers. Univers even comes with a 59 Ultra Condensed weight but I use that very sparingly, I just think Frutiger looks better. Serif texts are usually Palatino or Garamond.

 

However, on maps where I have some room for the labels (and/or a bit of design freedom) I generally try and use a not-so-standard font. Over the past few years I've done several greyscale maps for university publications (one professor found me and recommended me to some of his colleagues) and I've used Anivers for those. It's a sans-serif with some little unique quirks by a Dutch designer.

 

02_Antarctica_v05.png

 

About two years ago I treated myself to Questa and Questa Sans by the same designer and I've used those for "special" projects and labels, such as my upcoming Paris typographic map.

 

Screen Shot 2016-11-30 at 09.36.31.png

 

 


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#4
frax

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I have used the LFT Etica family a bit - since I have Adobe CC I did some search for fonts through typekit (no additional cost)

https://typekit.com/fonts/lft-etica


Hugo Ahlenius
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#5
Daniel Huffman

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It's getting to be a little overused lately, but I'm a big fan of Avenir. It's a geometric sans with humanist qualities; I find it pretty approachable. It doesn't make much of a show of itself, either, while still being attractive — as I have described it in the past, it's sort of like a man in a nice suit who introduces himself charmingly, then gets out of the way.

 

I've also been using a lot of Gill Sans of late. It has an older, classic look, and it pairs pretty nicely with a variety of serifs. In particular I like the advice I received to pair it with Goudy Old Style (though I use a revival called Sorts Mill Goudy).



#6
Esther Mandeno

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Thanks for the responses! Lots of good ideas.

 

@GeographyNerd - There is sort of a setting in ArcMap. On the Draw Toolbar, without anything selected, you can set the font to whatever you want. It will remain that way for that MXD until you change it (with nothing selected). Any new text items you add will be in that font. Plus, if anything isn't in that font, since it is already selected, it is easy to set it!

 

@Hans - I remember your favorites from the last time I asked (or it was asked in another thread, not sure)! Thanks for the reminder of Frutiger and Garamond. Garamond is a nice classic font that works everywhere. I'll check out Questa and Questa Sans.

 

@frax - Do you have to have Adobe's CC to get LFT Etica?

 

@Daniel - How you feel about Avenir is kind of how I feel about Myriad Pro. It's a sans font that is just easy to read and doesn't make a fuss. I'll check out Avenir as well.

 

Now, something a little bit harder. I've been asked to put together ESRI Story Maps. I've done a few and while there is the option to play with the fonts, I've kept to ESRI's default. I've been asked to do two more and I wanted to play with changing up the fonts. Any advice for webfonts?


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Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. - Albert Einstein

#7
Luca

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I'm a big fan of Frutiger (Condensed)


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#8
westcoaster222

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Paid fonts are great when you can afford enough weights, but you may want to take a look at all of the free fonts available now in particular the Google selection. Some fonts such as Source Sans and Open Sans have a large number of weights making it handy for maps with a lot of text. There are many good fonts to experiment with such as Merriweather Sans, Fira Sans (Firefox OS) and maybe even Ubuntu for those modern subway maps.

 

Google fonts here: https://fonts.google.com


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#9
frax

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@frax - Do you have to have Adobe's CC to get LFT Etica?

 

I think you can buy it from TypeKit.

 

Now, something a little bit harder. I've been asked to put together ESRI Story Maps. I've done a few and while there is the option to play with the fonts, I've kept to ESRI's default. I've been asked to do two more and I wanted to play with changing up the fonts. Any advice for webfonts?

 

I like the Roboto family - I would specifically try Roboto Condensed (I am a fan of condensed fonts). Back to TypeKit/AdobeCC - if you have that you can also use web versions of some of the fonts.
 


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Hugo Ahlenius
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#10
Esther Mandeno

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Okay - two votes for Frutiger. I'll have to go see how much that is... yikes! Well, if I use it as much as I use some of my other fonts, it could be worth the current $407 price tag (for all 19 styles). I will have to think about it.

 

@westcoaster222 - I've seen all the Google fonts before and just wasn't sure how to use them. Do I have to install them or something? I'll look more closely at it.

 

@frax - Roboto! I like the name and I think I even used it for something at some point. Not sure what.

 

I just double-checked the ESRI StoryMap I wanted to change the font on and it doesn't seem I can. I could have sworn I saw an option to do so. Maybe on a different template? Does anyone know if I host it myself whether I can then use whatever fonts I want?


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Esther Mandeno
Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. - Albert Einstein

#11
Hans van der Maarel

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Okay - two votes for Frutiger. I'll have to go see how much that is... yikes! Well, if I use it as much as I use some of my other fonts, it could be worth the current $407 price tag (for all 19 styles). I will have to think about it.

 

It depends on where you're looking, Myfonts has a good deal on the "complete" family (14 styles)


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#12
DaveB

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Esther, I don't know much about story maps, but if you ask your question on Esri's geonet forums at https://geonet.esri.com/ story map questions usually get pretty prompt answers from Esri folks and users who are very knowledgeable and helpful. I'm sure someone there can tell you what can be done with the specific story map and/or with story maps in general.


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#13
Matthew Hampton

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I've been using the Proxima Nova typeface for some recent mapping projects and really like the alt-variations as well the condensed and Xtra-condensed versions. It provides a lot of opportunity to dial-in a good fit for labels. I have been unable to change the font in any of the Storymaps that I have made.

 

I am sure it's something the team at ESRI has plans to provide in the UI at some point, however I think your options at this point might require downloading and modifying the code.


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