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#1
EcoGraphic

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"Here are a couple of resources for old style fonts. I have posted these before:

[url="http://"http://www.p22.com/"]P22 Type Foundry[/url]

[url="http://"http://www.fontcraft.com/csa/fontcraft.php"]FontCraft[/url]

Also, if you are ever looking for a nice (affordable) assortment of parchment backgrounds check out:

[url="http://"http://www.istockphoto.com/file_search.php?action=file&text=parchment&x=18&y=11"]iStockPhoto[/url] "
Gillian Auld
EcoGraphic Design
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Design is the intermediary between information and understanding
Richard Grefe

#2
Kartograph

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"Here is the updated version:

@Eco. Thanks I already have found the thread. As you see I found some fonts I liked. Hope you like them too.

Attached thumbnail(s)
[url="http://"http://www.cartotalk.com/index.php?act=Attach&type=post&id=370"]http://"http://www.cartotalk.com/index.php...ype=post&id=370[/url] "

Attached Files



#3
DaveB

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"A fun project :)

The
crane seems a bit modern to be part of the traditional Medieval to
Renaissance level of technology of Tolkeinesque fantasy so I'm thinking
a more ""modern"" style of map would be more appropriate than trying to
emulate the style of maps found in such books. Your map is certainly
different from any other fantasy maps I've come across (not that that's
a bad thing :) ).
On the other hand it seems you are mixing very
modern digital 3-D terrain, albeit softened somewhat by the PS filter,
with older elements such as the parchment background.
I'm sure you
don't want to go back and start from scratch, but I think a Victorian
era map style might've been more suitable for this map. (or, if the
technology level is generally more Medieval/Renaissance then an older
style without the 3-D terrain). Could be tricky though, assuming the
terrain is integral to the story. "
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek

#4
benbakelaar

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Looks better, like the new parchment and fonts!

I
wonder how it would look if you moved each of the 4 drawings to one of
the 4 corners... maybe had them all be roughly the same size too... and
then centered the map title, and removed the legend. Can't remember
seeing any legends on Tolkein's maps, but hey I could be wrong and that
may not be what your client is looking for.

#5
EcoGraphic

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"You
can also check out Mapmaker Plus for some weird 'map' fonts for use in
making antique looking gaming maps. They have building footprint fonts,
fonts for geographic features, etc.

Might be useful on another project.

[url="http://"http://www.fontcraft.com/mapmaker/"]Mapmaker Plus from FontCraft[/url]

Yah,
what's with the crane ?..... You should try blending the hard bottom
edge of the 3D map into the page so it looks like you drew it on...... "
Gillian Auld
EcoGraphic Design
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Design is the intermediary between information and understanding
Richard Grefe

#6
mike

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Your
revised version looks better. Although I think some more work can be
done on the river text. The kerning between some of the river text is
not the same and I think some of them can use some tuning on the
splining.

#7
Kartograph

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"

You should try blending the hard bottom edge of the 3D map into the page so it looks like you drew it on......


Any pointers? I would gladly do so, but as this is totally new territory for me, I didn?t know how to approach it. "

#8
mike

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"

You should try blending the hard bottom edge of the 3D map into the page so it looks like you drew it on......


Any pointers? I would gladly do so, but as this is totally new territory for me, I didn?t know how to approach it.
http://


most likely using Photoshop blur tools "

#9
MapMedia

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Pretty good - I liked the parchment beige color you had first.

Redo the fonts - something whimsical?

Basemap is really interesting! Nice work. Maybe instead of crosshatch try blur and
add lighting to make it look like there is a super thin coat of illuminating fog - create a sense of imaginary / magical place.

---

I
checked out mewisland - what is THAT about? A few maps, most are
paintings or airbrushes. The 1912 map is nice, but I cringed at how the
map intersects the scaled grid border - what's the point of the border
then? I don't believe that style (breaking the boundaries) was populatr
in 1912 either, lol



#10
Martin Gamache

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"

 
The 1912 map is nice, but I cringed at how the map intersects the 
scaled grid border - what's the point of the border then? I don't 
believe that style (breaking the boundaries) was populatr in 1912 
either, lol

http://



That technique has been around much longer than that in fact and IMO that map makes quite a good use of it. [url="http://"http://www.newisland.net/1912map.gif"]link to 1912 New Island map[/url] "

#11
EcoGraphic

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"

Any pointers? I would gladly do so, but as this is totally new territory for me, I didn?t know how to approach it.

http://


You
should be able to feather it in Photoshop. You could also try a
gradient mask overlay along the edge, but the feathering should work.
"
Gillian Auld
EcoGraphic Design
www.EcoGraphic.ca

Design is the intermediary between information and understanding
Richard Grefe

#12
MapMedia

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Hmmm...I would like to see an antique map that breaks the border, if the border is grid marks.

I
think the 1912 map is pleasant for sure, but cartography has to
properly balance design sense while maintaining complete
accuracy/utility, where I think breaking the grid sacrafices accuracy
for design flare, IMHO.

good dsicussion...

#13
EcoGraphic

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"

Hmmm...I would like to see an antique map that breaks the border, if the border is grid marks.


think the 1912 map is pleasant for sure, but cartography has to 
properly balance design sense while maintaining complete 
accuracy/utility, where I think breaking the grid sacrafices accuracy 
for design flare, IMHO.

good dsicussion...

http://



I
think maps that break the border look great, and show the person
designing the map put some throught into good layout. It is difficult
to bring together a completely organic element (the shape of the
geographical area in question) plus a linear border effectively without
using a technique like this. If you don't break the border, you just
end up with a sea of white and bunch of elements floating in it.



"
Gillian Auld
EcoGraphic Design
www.EcoGraphic.ca

Design is the intermediary between information and understanding
Richard Grefe

#14
Martin Gamache

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"

Hmmm...I would like to see an antique map that breaks the border, if the border is grid marks.

A

brief look at my antique references located several example of this,

there are a whole lot more but.... I've only attached one for your

enjoyment.


think the 1912 map is pleasant for sure, but cartography has to 
properly balance design sense while maintaining complete 
accuracy/utility, where I think breaking the grid sacrafices accuracy 
for design flare, IMHO.

The

New Island map breaks the border and the grid line, there is nothing

unusual or wrong about how its creator used this technique. You don't

have to personally like it but to imply it is ""wrong"" is a bit strong

and not really in the spirit I see used to critique other's work around

here, especially when done anonymously...

Keep in mind this is a map to an imaginary place, hence no better project to let design flare rule...

The

attached images are from a Samuel Holland and Thomas Pownall map,

published in London in 1776 and reproduced in The MapMakers's Art.

New Jersey to Quebec.

Attached Files



#15
MapMedia

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That's
fine, I was interested in seeing one (and thanks), not saying they were
non-existent. I stated my preference, not whether the 1912 map was
right/wrong.

I also think map critiques pose lots of room for
tangential discussions the critiquee might benefit from. All part of
the intellectual process of cartography.

Thanks




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