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#1
SteveR

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I recently visited Lake Tahoe, California and was informed that it has 63 creeks flowing into it, and just one stream, the Truckee River, flowing out of it.  

This got me to thinking.  Are there any lakes that have two or more streams naturally flowing out of them?  And are there any streams where the waters naturally divide and flow toward two different destinations?

 

Steve Richardson

2i3D Stereo Imaging



#2
Tom Patterson

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Hi Steve,

 

At Parting of the Waters, Two Ocean Creek forks to flow eventually into the Atlantic and Pacific oceans:

 

https://en.wikipedia...g_of_the_Waters

 

And in South America, Rio Casiquiare links the Amazon and Orinoco watersheds:

 

https://en.wikipedia...asiquiare_canal

 

I am not aware of any lakes with two outlets, but surely they must exist.

 

Tom


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#3
AndyM

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https://en.wikipedia...ifurcation_lake

 

Also a number of bifurcation lakes (eg: Wollaston Lake in NE Saskatchewan) are shown here http://geogratis.gc....b5c10cc35a.html

 


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#4
tangnar

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As far as steams/rivers that "naturally divide and flow toward two different destinations", water is forced by gravity to flow downhill, so the topography and geologic history would have to be unique so that a river is not 'confined' by a topographic watershed. Which is often very flat terrain. You see it happen in the Atlantic coastal plain often, where rivers have developed distributary channels in response to sea levels rising over geologic time (https://en.wikipedia...d_river_valleys) flow into the ocean in two directions. Or in large floodplains where there are a lot of old river channels and oxbow lakes. 

 

The Parting of the Waters example is really cool, I didn't know about that. Must be a very unique situation... flowing totally different directions across the continent. Seems like a good candidate for the 'places to visit' list. 


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#5
Dennis McClendon

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Just southwest of Chicago, a swampy area straddled the subcontinental divide between waters that flow to the Mississippi and the short stream that emptied into Lake Michigan.  Most of the year that made for an easy portage.  But in the spring, the area had enough water that "Mud Lake" could be paddled across.  Presumably Mud Lake drained off in both directions.

 

 

tB5peQR.png


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Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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