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about generating Elevation Tinted Hillshade , see example

- - - - - Swiss hillshade

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#1
andreamilani

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Hello everyone, I have a bit of confusion about generating Elevation Tinted Hillshade, online find many directions but I read more and more adds to the confusion.
some say
 ArcMap's Hillshading tool has the best hillshading algorithm around, others say that global mapper for this task is better. 
I use Arcmap 10.3, I want a result like this for example:
 
I have to use a high-resolution DEM, which I have bought bye local government,
from what I've read I have to generate a  multi-directional hillshade , and arcmap does not have this option while globalmapper 17 has it.
To achieve multi-directional hillshade with Arcmap I have to install the script HILLSHADETOOL9.3 .
 
HILLSHADETOOL9.3 contains "MDOW Hillhade model tools"which generates shadows  from more inclinations , 
HILLSHADETOOL9.3 contains "Swiss hillshade model  tool too " which generates  two files: Filtered_Hshd and Aerial_persp
 
at the end I get 3 files:  mdow_hshd, filtered_hshd and aerial_persp .
and with what, I have to combine these files to get the color you see in the example that I have linked? 
I like that kind of render for its specularity and three-dimensionality, it still remaining clear and usable for the overlap with the placenames
thank you
 


#2
andreamilani

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I am attaching a picture to have a base on which to start, 
here I have overlaid MDOW layer  (multi-directional oblique weighting) with  the input DEM raster display this on the top with a color ramp that has variations in hues to show elevation ranges using about 55% transparency:
11t5ua9.jpg
 
the color is ugly and does not look like what I wanted to imitate but I do not know how to get those colors.
 
here only hillshade:
ruabsy.jpg
 
some advice?


#3
David Medeiros

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The lighting on these terrains appears to be from the SE (or right to bottom right of page), and is causing some inversion for me. General rule of thumb is to keep lighting on a shaded relief emanating from the NW (or top left of page if the map is rotated off N to top).

 

Complex shaded relief is a bit of a dark art and for me at least takes several different applications and multiple layers composited together to get it how I like it. A straight SR from Arc can be ok but will always be a little rough, or harsh if not post processed in something like Photoshop or layered with texture layers and others.

 

Some folks here have had good results with Blender (an open source 3d app). I use Natural Scene Designer. Both will probably give better results than Arc in most cases.

 

If you are just getting started with terrain representations I'd recommend taking a look To Paterson site shadedrelief.com. He provides a lot of good info and tutorials for terrain representations. Check out reliefshading.com as well for more info. And finally, if you want something to read take a look at Eduard Imof's "Cartographic Relief Presentation."

 

http://www.shadedrelief.com/

http://www.reliefshading.com/


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#4
malkaitz

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David is right, it´s not an easy task to make a good shaded relief. A good and fast solution for me to make a different hillshade from simple analytic hillshade is the multi-directional  light method described in this paper ( I discovered it in a Cartotalk post):

 

http://pubs.usgs.gov...in_p101-106.pdf

 

luck!

 

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#5
andreamilani

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hi,thank you very much for your answers, I begin to realize that the topic is rather complex therefore I limit the field of my question starting with the first step.
malkowitz very interesting that article, I will read it carefully
David I had seen the two websites, they report some techniques and compare some software to generate reliefs but they date back to 2002 and I thought that in 16 years maybe someone is able to improve those algorithms, maybe.
I realized first of all that GIS generated  hillshades form are usually terrible and they  must be semplified .  What can I read or see specifically and updated to get a automatically or semi-automatically consistent generalization of digitally reliefs ?
I understand English but greater mastery of language would probably help me in the search
Have a nice day
 
 


#6
Matthew Hampton

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Hi Andrea,

 

That looks like fun terrain to map!  

 

The only time I use light from the lower right (SE) is for creating planimetric-oblique hillshades using Natural Scenery Designer.  

 

I didn't get relief inversion from the image - i think because the elevation tint reduced the possibility.  There are a variety of different color ramps you can use in ArcMap and here is an article to get you to the right download.


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#7
andreamilani

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p.s.: for the  multidirectional hillshade this is new:

 

http://www.arcgis.co...2c15ff09398e8e5



#8
andreamilani

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If you are just getting started with terrain representations I'd recommend taking a look To Paterson site shadedrelief.com. He provides a lot of good info and tutorials for terrain representations. 

I have read a few pages on google book of this book and I found it very interesting, I think I will buy it soon






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