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#1
DaveB

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For all the Illustrator (or FreeHand or Corel, etc.) gurus out there:
Do
you use layers to organize and otherwise manipulate sets of elements on
the page (as opposed to using layers for data as in a GIS)?
If so,
how do you use them? Do you just arrange all of the page elements and
map surrounds in one layer or do you use different layers for various
bits?

Thanks for any input :D
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek

#2
Martin Gamache

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A
legend bloc may have several layers in my documents, same with all the
other surround elements: Data frames, grids, grid coordinates, scale
bars, etc... all in seperate layers or sublayers.

But in
illustrator in theory every object has its own layers so it's a
question of semantics to a certain degree. If I get a chance later
today I'll post a screen shot of a typical layer pane for a large
project to give you an idea.

I use layers as the organisational
framework for my maps and certainly build on the initial layer set
exported by the GIS software. In terms of keeping things organised
Illustrator's layers and sublayers are very valuable and make up for
Illustrator's more limited selection tools (compared to FH) by allowing
you to keep things organised and to select all objects on the same
layer fairly easily.

It's probably best experienced through interraction or by demosntration than to try and describe it in words...

#3
ELeFevre

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"I
place each major feature (highways, roads, trails, cities, towns,
titles, etc) on its own layer within Illustrator or Freehand.

Imagine
having three different types of roadways all jumbled together on the
same layer and you only want to change the stroke on one of three
types. You could always try and select the feature manually if you have
the patience, but if each type of roadway was on its own layer... you
could lock all the other layers and do a ""select all"" on the active
layer and make your changes. Changes like this take seconds if you are
using layers. With layers you can hide features your not working on,
lock layers, et cetera. There are at least one-hundred excellent
reasons why layers are mandatory.

Using Illustrator without using proper layers is like driving a car with four flat tires. "



#4
patdunlavey

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Both. I use layers (and nested layers) extensively to organize content as well as layout elements.
Pat Dunlavey
www.pdcarto.com

#5
ELeFevre

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two more points...
I
think it's important to create a basic schematic on paper of how your
going to organize your layers within Illustrator or your GIS. Doing
this can save you a lot of time, especially if you can anticipate the
changes you need to make before diving in. Your schematic doesnt have
to include every layer and sub-layer, but mapping out the basic
framework is useful.

Also, having a basic layer schematic is helpful when your working on group projects, or similar projects using the same data.



#6
Rob

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"dave,
this is typically how I set up a project in AI. I try to use as many
well labeled layers and sublayers as pratical to keep data organized
and easily selectable. AI also lets you target a style/effect to the
layer rather than the objects in the layer, which I've found useful,
but kinda confusing to setup sometimes, when working on larger
projects.

rj

Attached thumbnail(s)
[url="http://"http://www.cartotalk.com/index.php?act=Attach&type=post&id=358"]http://"http://www.cartotalk.com/index.php...ype=post&id=358[/url] "

Attached Files



#7
Dennis McClendon

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"As
a FreeHand user, I have the additional power of styles, which both
define elements and can be used to select them. Layers are used
primarily to sort out the stacking order, and secondarily to keep
similar elements together so all of them can be easily selected.

Typically
""page elements and map surrounds"" are one of a kind, and all go on a
""marginalia"" or ""frame"" layer that's above everything else. "
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#8
Martin Gamache

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"Here
are screenshots from the layers palette and a fully expanded view of
the legend layer with every object or group in its own sub-layer...that
could be expanded further...but I think you'll get the point I was
trying to make in an earlier post.

[url="http://"http://www.cartotalk.com/index.php?act=Attach&type=post&id=361"]http://"http://www.cartotalk.com/index.php...ype=post&id=361[/url][url="http://"http://www.cartotalk.com/index.php?act=Attach&type=post&id=362"]http://"http://www.cartotalk.com/index.php...ype=post&id=362[/url] "

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#9
DaveB

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Thanks
for the input so far. I remember from my days of making maps with
Illustrator that I used layers for map surrounds and other page
elements, but some colleagues remain unconvinced. So good solid
examples are helpful in bolstering my argument.
We know people use
layers for features. My colleagues recognize that. I am just trying to
convince them that real cartographers use layers for stuff on the page,
too. <_<
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek

#10
Rick Dey

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Layers
and sub layers within the map, with the Pallete Options> Row Size
set to small (that will turn off those little preview icons that slow
things down rendering). Inset maps all recieve their own full set of
layers gathered up into a master layer each. Covers, ads {blech} or
other externals get their own collections too. Most of our maps will
run around 40 layers, some as many as 75.
We inititally developed
the concept of at least one layer for every scribecoat, negative,
and/or overlay that you would have had in a traditional mechanical
method. I know for some (possibly most) of you that's an arcane
reference, but we like to keep ourselves grounded in some tradition....

Rick Dey

#11
waypoints

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"

For all the Illustrator (or FreeHand or Corel, etc.) gurus out there:
Do 
you use layers to organize and otherwise manipulate sets of elements on 
the page (as opposed to using layers for data as in a GIS)?
If so, 
how do you use them? Do you just arrange all of the page elements and 
map surrounds in one layer or do you use different layers for various 
bits?

Thanks for any input  :D

http://



Not
only should you keep your layers organized and named you should also
keep notes on how you do certain processes or any new methods you
devise to overcome a problem. For example, I have brought things into
Macromedia Flash and back to Illustrator to overcome an inability in
Illustrator. "

#12
MapMedia

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Better late than never...

I am using a Freehand project with template from a client, am being somewhat fresh to FH MX, I see that the streets layer is one layer, but composed of secondary/primary/highways.

The template styles are there for these routes,but how to I split the single street layer to adopt the unique styles?

Seems Illustrator is more intuitive, but I am open to learning a altogether different approach.

Any clues?

Chris

#13
natcase

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Use graphic find and replace to select each style, then place it on a new created layer.



Better late than never...

I am using a Freehand project with template from a client, am being somewhat fresh to FH MX, I see that the streets layer is one layer, but composed of secondary/primary/highways.

The template styles are there for these routes,but how to I split the single street layer to adopt the unique styles?

Seems Illustrator is more intuitive, but I am open to learning a altogether different approach.

Any clues?

Chris

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Nat Case
INCase, LLC

Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
maphead.blogspot.com






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