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Slims River, Kluane National Park

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#1
brodco

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This map is meant as a sort of 'topographic portrait' and is poster sized (about 24" x 32"). It is of a popular section of Kluane National Park, in the Yukon Territory, Canada.

 

https://bemaps.files.../slimsriver.png

 

 

I just graduated from a GIS program and wanted to try out a few things I didn't have time for during school, especially with regard to relief shading in photoshop and contour masking in illustrator.  

 

Any comments/criticisms are welcome. Thanks.

 

PS- If you like this one, check out some of my older maps at https://bemaps.wordpress.com/ 



#2
Hans van der Maarel

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The map looks very nice, I especially like the relief shading, but if your intention is for it to work as-is as a poster you may want to add a legend.


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#3
DaveB

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Very nice! I also like your experiments with hand-drawn maps and the Scott's Last Journey map.

 

very minor point: if metres is spelled with "re" shouldn't kilometers also? :)


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#4
razornole

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The map looks great, I have enjoyed looking at it.  Your method is the same as mine for learning how to make topographic maps. I just started making maps of the places I hiked for myself and learned the skill.  I didn't learn it in graduate school.

 

I have worked primarily in the southern US and have never really had to deal with glaciers and snow packs.  What is your method with the isohypse blue vs brown.  Two sets?  Is that a purple hillshade I notice on the ice?  If so, two hillshades?  I also notice your colluvial fans (Lost Cache Cr), are you using hypsographic tints or just geomorphological vectors?

 

Thanks,

kru


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#5
tangnar

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Really nice looking map. Makes a great poster. 



#6
Curry

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the map looks very nice, thanks you for your sharing  :lol:



#7
brodco

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Thanks everybody for the good feedback. 
 
In regards to the legend, I was hoping the content was generally self explanatory. But you're right it's probably better to include one anyway.  
 
For the contour lines, I used a raster mask of the ice layer in black for the brown lines and then inverted it on a copy of that layer (actually two layers - one for index contours).  I learned this from Adam Wilbert's tutorial on vimeo, which was a great help.
 
 
Yes, that is a purple hillshade on the ice.  What I did there was I masked out the original hillshade with the ice layer and replaced it with a colourized and brightened purple hillshade.  This is done in photoshop using the hue/saturation adjustment layer and ticking off the colourize layer. I also did the hypsometric tint by colourizing and blending copies of the DEM.  For example, I used an inverted copy of the DEM as a mask on itself and applied a green hue to it for the lower elevations.  I believe you can also use the 'gradient map' to create your tint, and this may in fact be a better way, but I haven't really experimented with it yet.  The additional green texture on the fan is actually a 'wooded' layer I overlayed with a light transparency.  I hope that answers your question.  There's really so much you can do by just experimenting with all sorts of masks, blends and transparencies in photoshop, as long as you have a good idea of the result you're after.


#8
Agnar Renolen

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Nice shaded relief.  However, if you could turn the pink shades in the glaciers into cyan shades, it would be even better.

 

Agnat







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: map, kluane, yukon, park, topographic, slims, cartography, canada, hiking

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