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Interesting way of showing sloped streets

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#1
Hans van der Maarel

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This map is getting quite some attention on Twitter, I don't know who made it, but I thought it would spark some interesting discussion here.

 

Attached File  BdvlhlmCAAA2YER.jpg   101.59KB   19 downloads

 

So it appears every uphill street is shown as a slope diagram. It's a sort of birds-eye view anyway so the distortion that that approach brings is irrelevant. I'm not sure about the color scheme though, most of the ones I've seen (in the cycling community) use a green-yellow-red progression, although blue and black are sometimes used as well.

 

They're not kidding about the "very steep street" by the way, for kicks I checked Ballarat Street on Street View. Seems to be about 15 degrees slope, that's 30%...


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#2
DaveB

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Seems like a clear easy to read map and way of showing the general steepness and direction. Quite a bit of information without being cluttered. Someone may be able to nitpick at something minor, but I think I would find a map like this to be quite useful, both beforehand for planning purposes and during a ride for navigation, especially if I were new to an area.

 

Kudos to the mapmaker/s.


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#3
david17tym

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I like it, very clever, and it worked instantly for me.



#4
James Hines

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I don't get the reason why this map should be portrayed in this way, it's redundant, and adds an element not necessary for presentation unless requested by the client.  My overall impression with the sloped roads, is there elevation that it being presented?  If so then this is a weak attempt presenting cartographic information, and mindless interpretation.


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#5
Gretchen Peterson

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I like it. It gives you a clear understand of relative, if not absolute, steepness. Accompanied by a human interpreter such as a hotel concierge showing a traveler where to run or a bicycle rental company showing an out-of-towner where to cycle based on ability, it could be very useful.



#6
David Medeiros

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It's a great graphic approach to elevation information. I wonder what this would look like applied to San Francisco? ; )

 

The-Chevalier-Map-of-San-Francisco-600x6

 

398801_3_0.jpeg


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#7
Hans van der Maarel

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I don't get the reason why this map should be portrayed in this way, it's redundant, and adds an element not necessary for presentation unless requested by the client.  My overall impression with the sloped roads, is there elevation that it being presented?  If so then this is a weak attempt presenting cartographic information, and mindless interpretation.

 

Slope matters more than elevation for many users of the road, be it on foot, a bike or in a car. On my bike I'll gladly ride up, or down, a 5% slope at 2000m above sea level than a 15% slope at sea level. As long as you're not getting near the elevations where lack of oxygen is becoming an issue your absolute elevation is rather unimportant.

 

Of all the ways I've seen slope (of a road) presented on a map this certainly is one of the most, if not the most, elegant one. Yes, there is some geographic distortion because of that but that wouldn't hinder navigation.


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#8
Matthew Hampton

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I love that Chevalier map of San Francisco!  David, do you have a link to a higher resolution version?

 

It reminded me that the San Francisco Bike and Walking map shows elevation in an intriguing fashion.  I don't think it's as immediately intuitive as the Queenstown map, but is a good solution at that scale/extent.

 

Attached File  SfBikeMap.png   1.05MB   1 downloadsAttached File  SfBikeMapLegend.png   113.67KB   1 downloads


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#9
David Medeiros

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I love that Chevalier map of San Francisco!  David, do you have a link to a higher resolution version?

 

It reminded me that the San Francisco Bike and Walking map shows elevation in an intriguing fashion.  I don't think it's as immediately intuitive as the Queenstown map, but is a good solution at that scale/extent.

 

attachicon.gifSfBikeMap.pngattachicon.gifSfBikeMapLegend.png

 

Agreed, very nice map. Can't look right now, but I think Rumsey has it: http://www.davidrumsey.com

 

I lied, I had to look it up, here it is: http://www.davidrums...&mi=152&trs=156


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