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#1
Hans van der Maarel

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I'm working on a map that is showing a number of routes (cycling, mountain biking and walking) in a mixed urban/rural/forest environment. Most of it is no problem, but I'm a bit stumped on the inclusion of "fast bike routes". Bit of a tricky concept to explain, it's a network of bike paths in the city that are meant for general transportation. I.e. they're not chosen for being nice or scenic, they just get you from A to B and so are important to people riding bikes to commute, or to go about their daily errands, but for the more recreation oriented cyclists (the target audience of this map) they're not of primary importance. In fact, they're (probably) not even signposted as being special.

 

So for my "regular" routes I've opted to use clearly colored lines, using different dash patterns to distinguish between cycling, mountain biking and walking routes. When routes overlap I've drawn them parallel (sometimes up to 4). I could do this for the fast bike routes as well but that would promote them to a status similar of the touristic routes, which is not really what I want to do.

 

I've tried to display them as wider lines with transparency, but I'm not very happy with how this looks:

 

Attached File  Knipsel.JPG   253.31KB   29 downloads

 

Any suggestions would be most welcome.


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#2
Dennis McClendon

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I'm not sure I understand the various line categories shown on your snippet.  I don't care much for dashes because of the visual "chatter" they introduce, and would much rather use color variations or casings.

 

What are the numbered circles at big intersections?

 

As for the "fast" routes, I might try the opposite of a casing: a very thin violet or brown line that goes down the middle of the street.  From your explanation, I think you're striving to have in your line hierarchy three basic categories plus one "extra."  To me, that suggests three lines of equal weight and color saturation, plus one that's a variation from that scheme.


Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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#3
Hans van der Maarel

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Thanks Dennis! I was hoping to distinguish the 3 different kinds of use (cycling, mountain biking and walking) by the use of linestyles. Within every group there's one or more different kinds of networks (sometimes overlapping), which may or may not actually be signposted.

 

The numbered circles belong to the green lines, they're "fietsrouteknooppunten", bike route nodes. The green lines are a network of roads deemed to be suitable for recreational cycling (i.e. not too much car traffic, or seperate bike paths, and rather scenic) and the nodes on that network are numbered. On every node there's a map of the surrounding network:

 

Attached File  IMG_4280_fietsroute_netwerk.jpg   87.7KB   4 downloads

 

And throughout the network there's signs pointing you to the nearby nodes:

 

Attached File  netwerkroute.1133120666.jpg   17.49KB   4 downloads

 

This way you can plan your own route. This is not a national thing, rather it's being done by region (and sometimes they compete...) and in the border regions the Dutch network links to the Belgian and German ones. The dominant color used for these networks is green, so that's why I'm using it here as well (and green also happens to be the corporate color of my client).


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#4
Hans van der Maarel

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Yes, I think this could work. Maybe play with the colors for a bit and tweak the lines themselves (data quality differs per dataset)

Attached File  Knipsel2.JPG   207.94KB   6 downloads


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#5
Dennis McClendon

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Hmmm.  The dark gray thin lines end up looking like district boundaries.  Might need to use green or violet, or use a dotted line (with dots very close together).

 

I think the red-yellow-green distinction is too great.  It's a palette I've famously resisted (for other reasons) on US cycling maps.  I think you'd be happier if all three categories hang together better as a network.  Maybe green/chartreuse/ocher.  Or forest green/olive green/spring green.


Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#6
Hans van der Maarel

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The pale red and yellow lines are actually part of the basemap: highways and important roads respectively, but I think I may have to de-emphasize or drop that distinction.


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#7
Csongor Kovacs

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Is it a possibility to change the color of the background map (residential areas, roads) into shades of gray?

That way your bike routes would be clearly visible and it gives you more options for colors to choose from...

I've attached a NYC map with subway overlays I've worked on in the past for example.

 

Csongor

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#8
Hans van der Maarel

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Right now the background colors are similar to the "official" map of the city which will be used for the flip side of the map to show a more detailed view of the city itself (and which happens to be produced by me as well). For the sake of recognition and a consistent style I'd like to try and keep those colors.


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#9
Charles Syrett

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I think Csongor is on the right track, but if you want base map colour consistency you could try simply muting the base map (a simple white transparency layer should do it), and have the bike routes as strong colours above the mute layer. I've done this myself on complex thematic commercial real estate maps (where base map corporate colours are important), and it works well.

Charles Syrett
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