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Interview for Article on Globes

globes interview

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#1
brettmcg

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Hi all, I'm writing an article about globe design and wanted to chat with anyone with globe making experience about the decision-making process on what gets included, and what doesn't... specifically, looking at the quirks wherein tiny hamlets in Australia and Greenland make the cut, where cities of millions in China aren't included. As a fan of globes, I think I have a grasp on the how and why, but I'd love it if someone with more knowledge than I have could help confirm my findings. 

 

I realize that the challenges faced by globe makers are the same for cartographers in general, but it seems space is more of a premium for globes. Any help would be greatly appreciated... thank you!



#2
Hans van der Maarel

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I've made several globes in the past for customers and together with a partner are in the final stages of launching one (an inflatable one) of our own.

 

The main reason why some stuff gets included and other stuff doesn't is the same for globes and for regular maps: space. A small town in northern Canada or Siberia might be included because there's nothing else in the vincinity whereas a multi-million suburb of say Shanghai or Tokyo gets omitted because there's simply no room to label all of them. If we would simply select by number of inhabitants large swathes of the map would be empty and other areas would be so crowded with labels they'd be illegible. Cartography is finding the balance between the two and making informed decisions about what gets omitted and what gets to stay (also with keeping your audience in mind). It's not always easy to make those decisions. Take for example Minneapolis and St Paul. Minneapolis is the larger and more well-known one of the two, but St Paul is a state capital. Normally speaking I'd lean towards showing Minneapolis for an international audience, but if the focus is primarily USA (and other state capitals are shown as well) I'd add St Paul too.

 

If you have any more questions, feel free to ask,


Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#3
Nichodemus

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Two globe articles from Wired. May find some resources there.

 

http://www.wired.com...s-in-the-world/

 

http://www.wired.com...s-history-book/



#4
Hans van der Maarel

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I think I should elaborate a bit on my statement: in addition to space on the map regional significance plays an important role too.


Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics




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