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Advice for creating an interactive map that doesn't use an internet connection

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#1
KarenM

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Hi all- I'm looking for some advice here on a new map I've been assigned to make for an upcoming event.

 

  • The map: I need to make an interactive state map showing the locations of certain utilities.  The map will be loaded on to a Windows computer that will be stationed in an exhibit at a state fair.   I won't have access to the event computer until shortly before the fair starts, so I want to make something fairly simple that can be transferred with minimal dependencies.  The internet will not be available at the fair.

 

  • The software for the data: I have access to both ArcGIS & QGIS at my office to prepare the data.

 

  • The application: I am a little stumped on the best way to present a standalone interactive map.  The ones that I have made were all installed on a server and used online basemaps and hosted script libraries. The only thing that I can think of is to download Leaflet or Openlayers to my desktop and make the map as a local html file that is viewed using the browser.  However,  I feel like there is a more obvious choice that I am overlooking.  ArcGIS Explorer? Has anyone here ever made an interactive map like this- i.e. for an exhibit?

Thanks!

 



#2
Hans van der Maarel

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Exactly how interactive does this map have to be? Layer control? Querying objects? Measurements?

 

If you want to use Leaflet or OpenLayers you'll have to create a local basemap too. It's doable, but takes up extra work.


Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#3
KarenM

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Thanks for the comment on creating a basemap being a lot of work- I poked around in QGIS for a while and discovered this new plugin called TileCache Creator (https://plugins.qgis...lecachecreator/).  I had to monkey around with it for awhile, but it does work- creates local raster tiles of publicly hosted basemaps, such as OSM.  It's a relief to know that I can use this if needed.

 

As far as how interactive, I haven't decided yet and it will likely be up to me to determine.  It's for the general public, so I don't want it to be too complicated.



#4
frax

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You can use TileMill to create a tile cache as well, with loads of settings for CartoCSS and styling.

 

I would consider setting up a local webserver and using regular web map tools that way - you would need to download the libraries you use and put them on the local server.


Hugo Ahlenius
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#5
frax

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Oh, now I read the part about you not having access to the computer...


Hugo Ahlenius
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#6
Dennis McClendon

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I would probably lean toward a PDF with layers that can be turned on or off, and with hyperlinks to display attributes or popup info.  You can also do something similar with ordinary HTML; it's just that you have to decide up front on all the possible map views and capture them as images.  Here's an example I did a few years ago.


Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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