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Show historical "sequence" on a map

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#1
François Goulet

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I'm preparing a serie of maps for an exhibition on the Canadian Confederation of 1867.
 
I'm done up to 1867, and I have now to map the actual Canada which is not very difficult. I have to visually enhanced the four founding provinces (Ontario, Québec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia) and add a label to show when the other provinces and territories joined Canada. Simple.
 
But: I've been asked to visually show the order in which the provinces and territories joined Canada:
 
Manitoba and Northwest Territories (1870)
British Columbia (1871)
PEI (1873),
Yukon (1898),
Saskatchewan and Alberta (1905),
Newfoundland and Labrador (1949)
Nunavut (1999)
 
I thought of adding a graph besides the map, with a timeline and name of the provinces. Would this do the trick for you? If not, any ideas? I'm a little lost on this one...
 
Thanks!


#2
Charles Syrett

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My first impulse would be to show the different provinces in a progression of colours that looks intuitive: something like darkest to lightest, or most saturated to least saturated. And then just add the date under each province name. This would bypass the need for a graph.

Charles Syrett
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http://www.mapgraphics.com



#3
François Goulet

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Good idea. I'll give it a try...



#4
hasecbinusr

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I concur with that recommendation, however in the interests of clean design, you might think about using inner glow on the boundaries a la National Geographic style instead of solid polygon fills.



#5
James Hines

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You know what would be nice if all the useful articles and tutorial data on this site would be listed under a table of contents so that users whether they are members or not would have easier access to the information on cartographic techniques ala the information library.  Just an idea with the mention of the inner glow function hasecbinusr mentioned here, though even in this case the different software packages must be accounted for.  While we are at it, should the territories be under a different shade of the same colour because they are not technically provinces?  


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#6
hasecbinusr

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While we are at it, should the territories be under a different shade of the same colour because they are not technically provinces?


This is a good point. I could see the provinces being shades of one color and the territories being shades of a different color.


Off-topic:
 

You know what would be nice if all the useful articles and tutorial data on this site would be listed under a table of contents so that users whether they are members or not would have easier access to the information on cartographic techniques ala the information library.

 
I'm in the process of writing a tutorial manual for cartography in Illustrator for a client. I didn't realize there would be an interest on here for something like that, but I'd be happy to post them here as they're complete. If you're interested in specific things, send me a message and I'll add it to my list if it's not already there.



#7
Dennis McClendon

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I second Charles's thoughts, but two other ideas:

 

First, the date alone is probably a clear enough indicator.  A sequential array of colours is not inherently meaningful to the user, so you're making them do work for only 14 data points.

 

Second, this is a job for small multiples.  Have eight tiny little maps, each showing Canada as it existed that year, arrayed along a simple timeline to the right of or below the main map.


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#8
François Goulet

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Thanks everybody.

 

Based on you comments and suggestions, this is what I have so far:

 

1. Provinces and territories with date of entry in the Confederation (the designer will choose how differentiate the two types).

2. National Geographic-style strokes with a "proportional" color ramp based on date of entry.

 

Attached File  map.png   254.55KB   1 downloads

 

3. A graph because I had an idea I wanted to try...

Attached File  flag.png   104.88KB   0 downloads

 

I know quite well that I would never put all that on the same map, but I was asked for suggestions. The designer of the exhibition will be modifying the maps to fit the look and feel he gave to the rest of the design. I don't have to "spend" too much time on the design so,,,
 
So... that's it! ;)
 
 


#9
Charles Syrett

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I think Dennis' idea of the multiples is the way to go, if it's OK with your client. I have the 4th edition of the National Atlas of Canada, and that's exactly the way they did it (pages 85-86). You may have to go to a library to see it, or maybe there's a more recent version online, but it's worth a look. B)

Charles Syrett
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#10
hasecbinusr

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I agree, I think the small multiples might be worth a try.

 

In the first graphic you posted, the color ramp is completely lost on me and I cannot distinguish any difference in the darker shades of red. This might be better executed with bins of closely spaced dates (perhaps four classes).



#11
François Goulet

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The client really want one big a** map. I'll see what I can do...

 

Thanks!







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