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Greyscale bathymetry map

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#1
Hans van der Maarel

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I'm producing 2 maps showing bathymetry in greyscale (this one and a similar one for the area around Gibraltar)

 

Attached File  Map 4 (Faroe-Shetland) v1.jpg   215.89KB   10 downloads

 

Much of the overall style is in line with previous maps I've done for the same client.

 

Couple of things I'm not entirely sure about yet:

  • Placement of the legend, at least the Gibraltar one has large areas of land on it which I can use to place the legend, but on this one doesn't really have that. I'd rather not place it in the sea to be honest,
  • Should I make all bathymetry a step darker? Right now it's 30-40-50-60-70% grey. Coastline and land boundaries are at 85%.
  • Should I add one more depth level? -3000 or -4000? That would probably involve scrunching up the grey ramp a bit.

Any other comments are of course very welcome too.


  • Agnar Renolen likes this
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Red Geographics
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#2
natcase

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Personally, I'd put the key in the upper right in a white box, and I'd label the key "depth" with "1000m" as the label. I don't know what size this will reproduced at, but you could bring down the type size.

 

I wouldn't make the grayscale any darker, especially if you're going to keep the type in black. I'm actually finding the dark coastline kind of distracting, especially in places like the Faeroes where it's filling in. Could you work with no line? Would the contrast against the lightest gray be enough? Dunno... Hope this is helpful. I like the overall framing and type and the gray stepping is nice and clear.


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#3
Dennis McClendon

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I second the idea of trying the land with no stroke.

 

If you have them, I like to see a few spot elevations/soundings, as secondary support to a legend.


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#4
Charles Syrett

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I would definitely retain the stroke on the land. I think that's what makes this work. Without a stroke, a lot of people may find it confusing. Oh - and what's that typeface?

 

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#5
David Medeiros

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Agree on retaining the land stroke, but I'd lighten it up a bit by making it either thinner or a lighter grey (or both). Even with a very thin stroke you get the casing effect that separates one area from another.

 

I'd also look at reducing the class differences in the grey scale. I find the darkest class to be too dark given the amount of area it covers.

 

For the legend, I think you're ok where you are, but I would clip the shoreline back so that no strokes show up under the legend type. Even with K/Os it's distracting.


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#6
Hans van der Maarel

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Thanks for the input so far. I think I'll want to keep the coast line as-is, because that way it's in line with the other maps I have produced for this client (these are just 2 of a set of 8 for a new publication, and I've done around 6 or 7 for other works previously). I agree on losing it under the legend though, those fjords indeed make it look messy even with knockouts applied.

 

The typeface is Anivers, I like it ;)


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#7
woneil

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It's very good looking. I'm used to seeing charts of this region with a lot more detail in the bathy contours, but that has to depend on the purpose your client intends to put it to. The same can be said of the contour interval and range. Is the focus to be littoral, mid-depth, or benthic? 

 

The number of gray shades you can support depends in part on how it is to be reproduced. One method of squeezing more in is to outline the shades with thin contour lines, thus increasing perceptual contrast. Since the contours are pretty heavily smoothed anyway this wouldn't cost you any detail.

 

Will O'Neil


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#8
Bogdanovits

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I think that the contrast between each step is too high and the quality is the same (water) only the quantity is different (depth).

If is not a thematic map about the last one I would try 10-50% (not 30-70%).

 

Andras Bogdanovits



#9
Hans van der Maarel

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Good point Will, and to be honest I'm not entirely sure about the actual goal of the map yet. It's going to be published in a book about "surveillance and the environmental sciences during the Cold War".

 

Attached File  Map 4 (Faroe-Shetland) v2b.jpg   214.55KB   6 downloads

 

Made some changes, mainly the bathymetry color.


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#10
woneil

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Good point Will, and to be honest I'm not entirely sure about the actual goal of the map yet. It's going to be published in a book about "surveillance and the environmental sciences during the Cold War".

 

attachicon.gifMap 4 (Faroe-Shetland) v2b.jpg

 

Made some changes, mainly the bathymetry color.

Hans,

 

You have "2000 m" in bold.

 

I was professionally involved in surveillance during the Cold War, and in fact it is likely that I know many of the contributors to this volume. In this context surveillance will refer mostly to acoustic undersea surveillance of submarines, which went under the rubric of SOSUS. (See http://www.navy.mil/...ue_25/sosus.htm for an authoritative summary written by one of my former colleagues.) This involved arrays of hydrophones laid at depths of several hundred meters at the head of slopes looking down toward deep water. As the article explains, best results were obtained where water depths reached 3500 m or more. For this reason I would suggest adding a 4000 m contour.

 

The environmental effects to be covered by the book will no doubt include studies of marine life that make noise that competes with the noise emitted by submarines, surface wind-driven waves, the temperature structure as a function of depth, bottom topography, and the movements of water masses. Individual articles will no doubt have maps and diagrams of their own. Thus your maps will provide general orientation, and for this purpose I would think they should serve very well.

 

Am I correct in assuming that the geographic limits were selected by the editors? That, for instance, the exclusion of the Denmark Strait was their choice rather than yours?

 

To an extent, some of the surveillance systems made redundant by the end of the Cold War have now been turned to the study of the marine environment.

 

Best,

Will


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Will O'Neil
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