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Terrain texture or bump mapping resoruces?

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#1
David Medeiros

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Hi all,

 

I need to do some experimenting with shaded relief textures and bump mapping for a current project. Never worked with textures over my releif before so looking for guides and resources.

 

I work primarily with Natural Scene Designer and Adobe CS for maps but can also incorporate ArcGIS as needed.

 

I have the following resources to start with:

 

Tom Paterson's discussion of various techniques, including texture empaling. It's not very specific so I'm not sure of the exact workflow, but his results are amazing (of course):

http://www.shadedrel...lism/index.html

 

ArcGIS bump map tool. I haven;t used this yet but the results look less natural than Tom's. But it may be easier to implement:

http://blogs.esri.co...bump-map-tools/

 

Any other resources or tutorials you know of for adding veg textures to shaded relief?

 

Thanks,

David


GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#2
Matthew Hampton

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I have had used Photoshop to create textured pixels (texels) using different image overlays for different features with some good results.  Jeff Nighbert's work comes to mind as does Bruce Daniel's.

 

Here is a link to a presentation I gave at NACIS and some chatter.

 

 


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#3
David Medeiros

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Cool, thanks Mathew. Any chance you have a hi res copy of the presentation? I can't read the images for the Photo Shop menus.


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#4
David Medeiros

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Ok, so I've had some success with creating my own veg textures in PS (thanks to a few tutorials I found online, and especially information from Tom Patterson's articles and Matt's presentation above).

 

I'll attach a few samples here. What I'm doing in a nut shell is:

 

1) downloading land cover data from the USGS and reclassifying it in ArcGIS to have 4 classes for bare earth, scrub or grass, low density canopy, dense canopy).

2) opening the reclassed LC data in PS and creating new layers based on pixel selections by color (so one layer for each class basically).

3) performing some magic I won't explain here to get a substituted canopy texture into the LC selections.

4) re sizing the image to align it with the size of my background terrain, which also re samples the data creating softer less pixelated edges in the veg area.

5) sandwich veg textures and terrain and import into an AI map doc.

 

My main issue is that the original LC data is pretty coarse for my area so the pixels a quite large, even after re sampling the image looks pixelated. What I need now is a good technique in PS to render the edges of the veg pixels more naturally without overly softening the actual texture in the image.

 

Any help and advice is appreciated as is feedback to the results overall.

 

Thanks!

 

dave

Attached Files


GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#5
David Medeiros

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Composite of all the layers with terrain:

Attached Files


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#6
Daniel Huffman

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You might try making it look less pixelated using the Dissolve blend mode to fray the edges of your masks out a bit. May not give the sort of look you are going for, but it could be an option.

Attached Files



#7
Matthew Hampton

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One idea that worked for me was to use the sub-pixel % tree canopy from NLCD and make 4 classes of trees, giving each class a slightly different treatment. The variability within the superclass of Forest reduced the visual 'noise' on the edge.

Another solution might involve re-sampling, apply filter, repeat.

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#8
David Medeiros

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I have the tree canopy data for my area so I'll give that a try. I'm also going to try converting a re classified raster to polygon in Arc with the simplify polygon filter on to remove the pixelation along the edges. Import that in AI/MAPub and re save as a new raster for PS. That should give me the same extent variability of the LC data but with smoother edges. I'll post back if that works.

 

d


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#9
David Medeiros

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Raster to poly didn't give me the results I was looking for. Lots of polygon overlap and everything still looked very square and pixelated.

 

I need to somehow systematically remove all the individual single pixels from the image, aggregates other sections together a little more, and round off all the edges with no overlaps. Probably needs to be done by manually drawing in the areas and converting to raster.

 

I also tried the dissolve blend mode but that just introduced a lot of empty pixels into the pattern. 


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#10
David Medeiros

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So I found a workflow that results in slightly more natural shapes from the NLCD percent canopy data. In ArcGIS you can apply the 'Majority' filter to consolidate the pixels in the raster layer to they are more uniform, less noise, fewer isolated pixels , more 'clumping' of the data.

 

Then is PS apply the Box Blur filter to soften the edges to resulting image, as well as resampling to a larger size.

 

Attached is a shot of the new veg texture over hypso colors, no relief shading added yet. It's a little muddy looking but promising.

 

I'm noticing that the veg textures look better when they are all one class, not 2 or 3 as each class overlaps the other some and because this technique relies heavily on the multiply filter there are all these dark overlap edges that even when very small show up in the image. I may resort to a single class for trees with embossing to give it that 3d look and another flat layer for scrub or grass filling in a round the trees.

Attached Files


GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

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