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#1
razornole

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I'm having an issue where Photoshop CS6 won't read a white/knock out text.  By this I mean the only thing that Photoshop won't read is my white font on top of my interstate highway shields.  This is a vector file that I created in AI.  I had placed it in InD and exported it from there as a PDF when I originally found the problem.  Thought it was an InD issue, so I decided to try to open the AI file with Photoshop.  Same problem.  I have tried several work arounds, but I can not get it to open/read the white font.  If I open the file in RGB in Photoshop it will open up just fine, however, if I try to open it in CMYK that is when it won't open the white font. 

 

Next step was to outline the text, and that didn't work.  Next step was to save it as an .eps, that didn't work. 

 

In the samples are what I tried to open with the font (though it is no longer a font as I have outlined them) set to 0,0,0,0 and then another file where the value is 0,0,0,5.  At least I can see the font when it has a K value of 5, but a K value of 5 should be damn near white, not what color Photoshop has given me.

 

Anyone else had any issue with this?

 

kru

 

 

Attached Files


"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
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#2
Dennis McClendon

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Make sure the white text isn't set anywhere to overprint.  I have a lot of trouble with this in Illustrator, and recently had an unpleasant surprise when it worked just fine as a PDF but not as an EPS.  You might have to check it two ways: by selecting the text object and by selecting the characters themselves with the Text tool.  In the 5% example, you can see how the black is overprinting the blue shield.


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#3
razornole

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Thanks Dennis,

 

That was the problem.  I don't even know what overprint is, and didn't have much luck with a quick google search.  I did have to direct select the font/s and then go to my Appearance menu to see that the fill was overprint.  I did mange to work around the issue before I read your post by deleting the fonts and make a whole new ai file with only those white fonts and placing it on top in InD.

 

kru


"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#4
Dennis McClendon

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Well, in the old days of two-color printing, we had to spend a lot of time worrying about trapping and overprinting.  Imagine printing medium blue landmarks over a 25% black ground:

 

11mdOPc.png

 

Now the problem that can sneak in with Illustrator is overprinting a white object or type.  The darker color underneath, like your Interstate shield, doesn't get knocked out to white because the overprint attribute is specifically instructing otherwise.  The only people who ever really need to overprint white are folks who screen print T-shirts and the like with actual opaque white inks, but Illustrator lets everyone get in trouble with this capability.  Kelso's plug-ins page lists two different plug-ins (Phantasm CS and Worker 72a) that look for this issue and alert you.

 

Overprinting and trapping in general are much less of a problem with CMYK process printing, and modern prepress software takes care of so much of this that many young designers don't ever think about it.  But in two-color work like I sometimes do for books, you can end up with maps that look nothing like you planned, nothing like the client saw in PDF proofs, and everyone involved points back up the line until they get to you.


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#5
David Medeiros

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This is a very timely post Dennis, as I'm facing my first offset job in a long time (probably 2 color, not decided yet) and need to refresh my habits in dealing with this.

 

Back at CSAA we had some basic guidelines to follow for setting over prints, and would print a proof of each plate to look for type knock outs on other layers.

 

I forgot how careful you need to be in setting this up.


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#6
razornole

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I think that I am more confused now, but at least I am understanding why it is/was done. 

 

Thanks for the help,

kru


"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#7
Dennis McClendon

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Razornole, usually when we make something white in Illustrator, we mean to have no ink at all and let the paper show through.  But Illustrator treats an overprinting white as if it's going to put white paint there, on top of whatever else there might be.  When the RIP or Photoshop, further down the line, says "I don't have white paint" . . . your shields print without the expected white letters.

 

Both Illustrator and InDesign have a function called Separations Preview that allows you to quickly check what will happen when you get to separations.  You can't see all the details of trapping—which you should probably let the RIP software handle anyway—but you can easily see if you've got a knockout you didn't expect, or if you're missing one.


Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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