Jump to content

 
Photo

Illustrator: release clipping mask and objects return to original layer?

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1
Dennis McClendon

Dennis McClendon

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,077 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:map design, large-scale maps of cities
  • United States

I think I've gotten myself in a world of trouble here as I try to migrate some big projects from FreeHand to Illustrator.

 

My practice in FreeHand was to draw my map with a variety of layers, then to paste those inside a neatline.

 

If I do that in Illustrator it works just fine—but if I release the clipping mask the various objects don't return to their original layers.  I've searched various forums and manuals, but it seems like everyone assumes the only thing you'd ever use a clipping mask for is to put a photo of a kitten inside a heart or somesuch.  Is there a setting or command that I'm missing?  FreeHand has a Preference: Remember Layer Info.


Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#2
Charles Syrett

Charles Syrett

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 536 posts
  • Canada

Dennis, I made a valiant attempt several years ago to migrate over to Illy, and gave up after several months because I just couldn't make a business case for it. Everything takes longer for my kind of mapping work if I use Illy. But I did keep detailed notes on all kinds of things in a dedicated text file. Here's what I wrote about clipping paths:

 

CLIPPING PATHS
- make sure path to be used for clip is at top of all objects
- select all objects
- Object > Clipping Mask > Make
- note: releasing contents does NOT remember layers!!!!!!!!!
 

So there you have it. I wrote that several years ago, but maybe things have changed since then. Good luck!


Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com



#3
Adam Wilbert

Adam Wilbert

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 273 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bellingham, WA, USA
  • United States

It works if you make the layers you want to clip sub-layers at the same level and below your clipping shape. Then select only the container layer (not all the objects) and choose "make clipping mask" from the layer panel fly out menu. When you do this the objects don't move from the layer they're on into a clipping group.

 

Attached File  Screen Shot 2013-12-10 at 5.36.53 PM.png   20.94KB   26 downloads


Adam Wilbert
CartoGaia.com & AdamWilbert.com
Lynda.com author of "Up and Running with ArcGIS"


#4
razornole

razornole

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 449 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ozark Plateau, Arkansas
  • Interests:Photography, Cartography, Down-river canoeing, Backpacking, Cross country biking, Geomorphology, Ornithology, Ecology, Quaternary, and last but first; drinking beer on the beach.
  • United States

Thanks Adam,

 

I never knew that.  However, I am typically working with 100-150 layer/sublayers, still a whole lot of work.  My work around has either been to save two files, a master file (unclipped) an a clipped file that I send to press.  Another method is to make a "trash" layer and duplicate the layers that are going to be clipped and move them to the trash layer and turn that layer off (don't clip it). 

 

Since clipping is destructive to layers, I will only clip what I need to clip.  For me that is usually only streams and roads.  You can always Select-Same-"attribute" to get them off a clipping mask and back into their original layer.

 

kru


"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#5
Dennis McClendon

Dennis McClendon

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,077 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:map design, large-scale maps of cities
  • United States

The project in question is an architectural guidebook to Chicago revised once a decade.  As if I didn't already feel old enough, this is my third time doing these maps.  So while I still do a lot of work in FreeHand, I just thought it was unwise to expect there to be any way to open and revise FH files a decade from now.

 

Thanks to all for the Illustrator help.  I think I'll just return to my old practice (from the days when we worried about RIP speed) of having a white collar—a compound path of two rectangles with white fill—that covers up the area outside the neatline.


Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#6
David Medeiros

David Medeiros

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,061 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Redwood City CA
  • Interests:Cartography, wood working, wooden boats, fishing, camping, overland travel, exploring.
  • United States

Thanks Adam,

 

I never knew that.  However, I am typically working with 100-150 layer/sublayers, still a whole lot of work.  My work around has either been to save two files, a master file (unclipped) an a clipped file that I send to press.  Another method is to make a "trash" layer and duplicate the layers that are going to be clipped and move them to the trash layer and turn that layer off (don't clip it). 

 

Since clipping is destructive to layers, I will only clip what I need to clip.  For me that is usually only streams and roads.  You can always Select-Same-"attribute" to get them off a clipping mask and back into their original layer.

 

kru

 

This is about what I've always done. Either set up a Master file that never gets clipped, and a publishing file that is clipped and updated from the master, or simply leave the clip or mask operations to just before exporting for publication, then undo those changes before saving (or save first then close wiothout saving).

 

David


GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#7
Adam Wilbert

Adam Wilbert

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 273 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bellingham, WA, USA
  • United States

... having a white collar—a compound path of two rectangles with white fill—that covers up the area outside the neatline.

 

This is typically my approach as well. Or some combination of this and additional embedded files combined into a master "print" file. Clipping in Illy is definitely wonky. Having never used Freehand though, I'm blissfully ignorant of how good things *could* be. 


Adam Wilbert
CartoGaia.com & AdamWilbert.com
Lynda.com author of "Up and Running with ArcGIS"


#8
frax

frax

    Hall of Fame

  • Associate Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,299 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Stockholm, Sweden
  • Interests:music, hiking, friends, nature, photography, traveling. and maps!
  • Sweden

Note that another way to do this is to use a mask, btw!

 

If I have multiple layers and a complicated illustration, I am not alien to using the 'white boxes' methdology.


Hugo Ahlenius
Nordpil - custom maps and GIS
http://nordpil.com/
Twitter

#9
koen onestopmap

koen onestopmap

    Newbie

  • Validated Member
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Belgium

It works if you make the layers you want to clip sub-layers at the same level and below your clipping shape. Then select only the container layer (not all the objects) and choose "make clipping mask" from the layer panel fly out menu. When you do this the objects don't move from the layer they're on into a clipping group.

 

attachicon.gifScreen Shot 2013-12-10 at 5.36.53 PM.png

 

Thank you Adam, it took me a bit to figure it out, but this really works. Learned something new today :-)


Editable vector maps for graphic design, webdesign, presentations, personal interest.

www.onestopmap.com


#10
ErinGreb

ErinGreb

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 30 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Doylestown, PA
  • Interests:atlas design, textbook cartography, historical map design, guidebook maps
  • United States

Sub-layers are definitely the way to go, especially when insets are involved - you can't put white boxes around an inset!

 

Attached Files



#11
frax

frax

    Hall of Fame

  • Associate Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,299 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Stockholm, Sweden
  • Interests:music, hiking, friends, nature, photography, traveling. and maps!
  • Sweden

Erin, I usually have the insets as separate files that I place. If they are square, I would use the artboard to "clip" the outer edges.


Hugo Ahlenius
Nordpil - custom maps and GIS
http://nordpil.com/
Twitter




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->