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La Rioja (Spain) Relief map using multiple light sources

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#1
iderioja

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The GIS and Mapping Section of La Rioja (Spain) has made a new shaded relief map based on LIDAR flight data from The National Aerial Orthophoto Plan in Spain (PNOA) 2010.

 

The relief was rendered using Collete Gantenbein (Idaho University) methodology. The use of multiple light sources achieves higher visual plasticity that facilitates the interpretation of the territory. In order to perform this work in a fully automated way, FME Desktop (Safe software, British Columbia) software was used.


A paper in spanish about this work was published in the Spanish Spatial Data Infrastructure blog.
Both the elevation data and relief images can be freely viewed and downloaded through our OGC services, from the IDErioja Geoviewer and from GitHub.

 

@iderioja


Edited by iderioja, 02 September 2013 - 07:43 AM.


#2
Lui

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Well I'm using familiar method for a decade now. I think that an old manual hillshading was all about local adjustment of light azimuth. My prefered method is using several azimuths like 315°, 345°, 285°,... The only problem is how to delineate regions with same azimuth and how to create a viable hillshade between them. I'm also experiment with hillshading parameters based on different landcover.



#3
iderioja

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Well I'm using familiar method for a decade now. I think that an old manual hillshading was all about local adjustment of light azimuth. My prefered method is using several azimuths like 315°, 345°, 285°,... The only problem is how to delineate regions with same azimuth and how to create a viable hillshade between them. I'm also experiment with hillshading parameters based on different landcover.

We are really interested in your work. Could you please send us any references about that work? 



#4
Lui

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Well the hillshading in mountain map of Triglav was made in that manner. In reality (printed) hilshading is not so powerful as it looks from overview and cliped image.



#5
rudy

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I've tried replicating this approach entirely in ArcMap. Getting the 3 transparent hillsahdes to work is no problem but the tweaking that is done in Photoshop as described in the process you refer to (shadows and highlights) is tough to do. Has anyone had any luck in doing so? It is also tough to do this on a national level (think Canada) that works for the entire country.



#6
DaveB

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Hi Rudy,

Maybe this link will help you? http://blogs.esri.co...lshade-toolbox/


Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Relief map, FME, La Rioja (Spain), multiple light sources

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