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My (our) first map

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#1
François Goulet

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Hi!

 

I'm moving in 3 weeks and while packing, I stumble upon the box containing everything from my master degree (in History).

 

For my thesis, I create 9 maps, before I had any cartography training. I thought it would be fun to share our first step into mapping! :)

 

Context: I studied the king's Council of Philip VI, king of France (1328-1350) through the king's acts. This map show the number of acts commanded by the Council or Councillors and which area they concern (I was looking for a pattern).

 

It's far from perfect, the diverging color ramp is wrong, but I think it's still good.

 

It was made in Illustrator.

 

Your turn! ;)

Attached Files



#2
ProMapper

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The French on your map reminded me of Minard's visualization of the self destructive  Napoleon's March to Moscow, probably the very first scientific cartographic visualization....

Here is the link http://upload.wikime...2/29/Minard.png



#3
Dennis McClendon

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August 1977.  Not my first map—but my first published map.  I was editor of my college newspaper and this, among other labors of love in producing my first issue, caused me to pull an all-nighter and then fall asleep at a rock concert.

 

Anyway, I'd recently discovered technical pens.  This map was traced from the Oklahoma state highway map's Tulsa inset, but those dual-line freeways are hand-drawn.  The lettering, too.  Interesting that I seemed to know the river should be labeled in italics.

 

For some reason, it never occurred to me to include the university's satellite (engineering) campus.

 

dFKIYLP.jpg


Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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#4
frax

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Dennis - did you have any idea then that you wanted to be a cartographer?


Hugo Ahlenius
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#5
Dennis McClendon

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Not in so many words.  In those days of scribing peelcoat in some state highway department or the back room at Gousha, that could be a pretty prosaic 9 to 5 job.  More drafting than design.  I was still exploring all sorts of things, from radio to journalism to graphic design to law school.  And it was during the bad years for geography as a field of study in the US.  "Urban geography" was supposedly required for my major, but was never offered.

 

But the attraction was there.  I became a passionate urban studies major, largely because of the maps.  My summer job three years running was with a retail site evaluation company, which first came to my attention because I saw large city maps hanging on their walls.  I went in and asked "what do you do here?"  and "are you hiring?"  When I got to law school, I got myself appointed to the campus shuttle bus committee . . . because I wanted to make a better map of the system.


Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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#6
Daniel Huffman

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My very first attempt to sit down and make a proper map (well before I had any training) was probably this one:

 

http://upload.wikime...o_River_Map.png

 

I remember using a program called Map Maker, which crashed all the time. The end result is rather painful to look at, but of all the maps I've made, it's the one I'm the most proud of. I learned what shapefiles were, how to track them down, how to manipulate them in this unfamiliar program, etc., all without any outside assistance or coaching. I think that's a pretty good first attempt, all things considered.

 

Someday I really should go back and replace it on Wikipedia with something not-terrible, though.


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#7
skorasaurus

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Like Daniel, my first map is also the one that I'm the most proud about.

 

I too didn't know anything about shapefiles or cartography. I was a fresh college grad who wanted a map of my neighborhoods in my hometown. I learned on my own and used osmarender (an old program that created SVGs from OpenStreetMap data) and then refined the map in the gimp.

 

 

This is the earlier version of that I can find at the moment, made 3 or 4 months after the original one. 

http://www.flickr.co...rus/5494989767/



#8
Hans van der Maarel

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The earliest ones I could find... These were made when I was an intern for the City of Nijmegen, back in early 1998. Only have these paper copies, so you'll have to do with crappy cellphone pics for now.

 

Attached File  2013-08-15 21.01.03.jpg   156.98KB   59 downloads

(The general route map to the various city offices downtown, technically this is the first map I ever produced that was meant for the general audience)

 

I initially had to work with Microstation there, and then run the DGN files through something called "CadScript" (if I recall correctly), assigning styles to various levels and outputting an EPS file. I quickly convinced them to let me use Illustrator and MAPublisher (on account of having used that combination at my previous internship). There were loads of problems with the printer's, mainly fonts. The printer's office was on the other side of town, which was either a 20 minute bike ride or a 5 minute train ride followed by a 30 minute walk... When we finally sorted out all the problems I was confident it was going to be a great map. Next morning I come in the office and see a stack of the printed maps on my desk, so I look at it very proudly, turn it over to study the back (overview map of the municipality) and notice one layer appears to have been shifted. So I call the printer's and utter the famous words "stop the presses", to which they reply "yeah, we're done already...". I suspect it happened because they opened the Illy file and played around with it... I know for sure my file was good.

 

Attached File  2013-08-15 21.01.59.jpg   243.14KB   54 downloads

(A derived map for another organisation, the first map I ever produced for an "outside" client)

 

I had made maps before at a previous internship and in school of course, but those were either for internal use or for assignments.

 

 


Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#9
rudy

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The first maps I remember drawing were ones that filled a notebook that became my hand-drawn atlas of the world (or the country - I can remember which). I drew this when I was in grade school, about 8 or 9 years old. Sadly it is lost forever. Strangely, though I loved maps and loved drawing them (particularly military-type maps that showed troop movements across the landscape) I never considered cartography as a future field of study and work. I never even thought that people actually did this as part of their job. So I went out and became a social worker instead. After a few years of that, I had had enough and was looking around for something to do when I came upon cartography. And I ave enjoyed it ever since! My first published map came about before I went to school to study cartography and I am now embarrassed by it. It has a hand-drawn one I didn't even make the effort to use a straight-edge to draw the scale bar! Ouch! I do believe my maps have improved since then.






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