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Which is better, ALL CAPS or Title Case for map typography?

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#16
ProMapper

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I find another problem in uploading on Cartotalk, it automatically resamples the jpg to a compressed version, both in size and quality.

 

Here are the two original files for you on Dropbox, the first title case typography,  https://www.dropbox.... title case.jpg

and the second file in all caps https://www.dropbox....sample caps.jpg

 

And here is the increased font size and more black in title case https://www.dropbox....le_case_new.jpg



#17
Strebe

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All caps is more legible. Mixed case is more readable. At the smallest sizes, legibility is critical. Using mixed case at intermediate sizes adds another axis of visual cues necessary in a dense display. Paradoxically we also tend to use all caps at the largest sizes as well, perhaps as a cultural habit inherited from newsprint, where legibility draws the eye. However that practice also ties together a strand of text with heavy tracking that spans cluttered space.

-- daan Strebe
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#18
Hans van der Maarel

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BTW, do we have any roads named in honor of any cartographers, I haven't found one in India yet.

 

You have a whole mountain named after one, isn't that enough? ;)

Oh I forgot, Mount Everest, but unfortunately it is in Nepal not India.

:unsure:  me bad...


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#19
ProMapper

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BTW, do we have any roads named in honor of any cartographers, I haven't found one in India yet.

 

You have a whole mountain named after one, isn't that enough? ;)

Oh I forgot, Mount Everest, but unfortunately it is in Nepal not India.

:unsure:  me bad...

No way... :unsure:



#20
Dennis McClendon

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One tricky thing you have to go back and check when changing everything to title case is internal capitalization.  So Hart-collett Vfm Park becomes Hart-Collett [Volunteer Firefighters Memorial] Park.

 

Then, as Hans noted, different languages use different rules.  So I would always change to Via la Barranca, Calle Vista del Asta, Calle de los Suel, Avenida de Diamante, Tierra de Oro, etc.  But I would also put the tilde in La Cañada.


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#21
Charles Syrett

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La Cañada.

 

...which is pronounced Can-yada, and has nothing to do with the country! And speaking of Canada, here we have a whole other set of cautions around French names. The rules aren't even consistent; some clients want us to capitalize "Rue" ( = street) while others insist on lower case "rue".


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#22
ProMapper

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One tricky thing you have to go back and check when changing everything to title case is internal capitalization.  So Hart-collett Vfm Park becomes Hart-Collett [Volunteer Firefighters Memorial] Park.

 

Then, as Hans noted, different languages use different rules.  So I would always change to Via la Barranca, Calle Vista del Asta, Calle de los Suel, Avenida de Diamante, Tierra de Oro, etc.  But I would also put the tilde in La Cañada.

Oh, the automated Label Placement even with LabelPro has its pitfalls. If we do all caps, that also generates few issues, and if Title Case that has many more. I also noticed HS (High School) becoming Hs, which is not kosher. So any automated change in case needs thorough checking. My apologies, it was done very quickly with automated solution as a test case.

 

Anu

http://www.mapsandlocations.com



#23
Agnar Renolen

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Try read a longer text in all caps. Believe me you will discover it is harder than reading lower case text. That's because lower case letters are more distinct than upper case letters with ascends and descenders.

When we read normal text, we recognize the content word by word. In case of map labels they are often unfamiliar strings that partly needs to be read letter by letter. It is therefore important that map labels are set in a font with legible letters. Upper case characters may be easier to recognize in small sizes.

Personally I use upper case together with bold to lift labels up in the label hierarchy. That is, to label large or/and important features. For example I may label residential streets in lower case, while the main roads are labeled in upper case.
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#24
François Goulet

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La Cañada.

 

...which is pronounced Can-yada, and has nothing to do with the country! And speaking of Canada, here we have a whole other set of cautions around French names. The rules aren't even consistent; some clients want us to capitalize "Rue" ( = street) while others insist on lower case "rue".


Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com

 

In Quebec, the Commission de toponymie as a very strict rule book about how to write names... 

 

Alone on a map, it should be "Rue Saint-Denis" because it's the beginning of the name. But if you write "I was on rue Saint-Denis", it's a lower case "R" because its just the type and Saint-Denis is the name (I don't know if it's the right translation, but we say that "rue" is the generic and "Saint-Denis" is the specific).

 

I still found it confusing sometimes. I live on "Rue du Baron", and the middle part is lower case because it means "Baron's Street". But, I work on "Rue de La Gauchetière", with lower and capital first letters because "La Gauchetière" is the name of a dead guy.



#25
Charles Syrett

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Thanks for the clarification, Francois! Now I'm better-equipped reply to my clients when they make such requests. I also find it oddly gratifying that even a Francophone carto such as you finds this confusing! :rolleyes:


Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com



#26
Kathi

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  :) BTW, do we have any roads named in honor of any cartographers, I haven't found one in India yet.

 

 

Searching Google maps turned up "Mercatorstrasse" both in Duisburg an Frankfurt am Main, both Germany.

In Aarau, Switzerland, there's an Imhofstrasse, but I'm not sure if it's named after the cartographer Eduard Imhof or some other Imhof.
Guillaume-Henri Dufour was a Swiss general but also the author of the first detailed map of all of Switzerland (at 1:50'000, I believe), he has streets and squares named after him in a whole bunch of Swiss cities. Plus the Dufourspitze, the highest point in Switzerland at 4636 m a.s.l. (one of the summits of the Monte Rosa) ...

So I guess there are quite a few places named in honour of cartographers. (Counting geologists, too, who after all produce their own maps, would lead to quite a few more, the highest mountain of Canada, Mount Logan, among them...)


Cheers,

Kathi

#27
Hans van der Maarel

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Apeldoorn in The Netherlands (for who I have been producing the official city maps for over 10 years now) has a "Kaartenmakershoeve" (map makers court), as well as a "Landmetersveld" (surveyor's field) and for years we've been joking about adding a trap street named after one of my colleagues there.


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