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'CMK' color scheme?

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#16
Dennis McClendon

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The printer is probably more familiar than you with how to do this, so you may want to just send an Illustrator file.

 

If your Illustrator file has been pared down to only the four spot colors, I think it will print separations properly.  Illustrator's choose-by-color capability should allow you to root out anything that's still an RGB or CMYK color and make it one of your four spots.  The main concern for you is which colors should be set to overprint.  Without thinking intensely about it, I would say all of them should be.  Silkscreen inks are pretty opaque.

 

If spot colors don't give you four, and exactly four, separations with no screens other than the ones you deliberately put in for the open water and woodland fill, you may have to resort to the way we did it in the 90s: having the CMYK seps pretend to be spot color seps.  Make contours and contour labels 100M, and then tell the printer the M separation prints in brown.  Make the green stuff 100Y and [some percentage] Y and tell the printer the Y is his green sep.  Make the water 100C, etc.  


Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#17
chris henrick

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I found a good article on how to prep an AI file for screen printing, but following this process for a map design would be arduous if not nearly impossible: http://www.smashingm...be-illustrator/

 

I've sent the new 4 spot-color proof off to the printer and am waiting for their feedback. I am curious about which layers to set to overprint in order to compensate for registration. I'll let you know what he says.

 

here a link to the spot color proof: https://docs.google....dit?usp=sharing


-Chris

#18
Dennis McClendon

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Part of the design of traditional topo maps was avoiding the need for complex trapping as described in that article.  I think you'll be good if you set all colors to overprint, and the screen printer lays them down in order lightest to darkest.


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Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#19
Agnar Renolen

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First, I cannot imagine there is much money to save by leaving out a colour. Modern printing machines print all four colours at once anyway, so it is plain stupid to send the paper through the yellow work without adding some ink to it. Ok, you save the yellow printing plate, but with modern computer-to-plate technology, these ate cheaper to produce nowadys anyway.

Secondly, I'm also puzzled about those of you who still print maps using spot colours. In my opinion, printing technology is so good nowadays that all maps can be printed using pure CMYK.

#20
Dennis McClendon

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Perhaps you missed the part about this project being screen printed.

 

As for spot vs. process, the biggest problem is thin brown contour lines.  Because brown is made up of three process colors, thin lines will never look crisp enough when printed from process combinations rather than a single spot color.


Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#21
DaveB

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There are also colors that are outside the gamut that can be produced from CMYK. Maybe a special "corporate" color, for example, that a company uses to brand their products.


Dave Barnes
Esri
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#22
Agnar Renolen

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Perhaps you missed the part about this project being screen printed.

 

As for spot vs. process, the biggest problem is thin brown contour lines.  Because brown is made up of three process colors, thin lines will never look crisp enough when printed from process combinations rather than a single spot color.

 

Sorry for missing out that point!

 

On your second point, asuming paper print, modern printing technology allows you to print with a denser halftone than before.  Hence I don't consider that a problem anymore. I have also good experience with stochastic halftones, in that regard.







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