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#1
skorasaurus

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So, I was asked to make a map for their wedding for my sister and brother-in-law to include in their invitations.

 

Some of their guests will be from out of town and staying at the
hotel that they reserved so my 'clients' wanted to emphasize them as the
primary audience but also still include roads and basic directions for local
people from the area who'll be driving in that day.

 

There's 3 POIs on the map: the Church, the Reception Hall, and the Hotel where some guests will be staying.

 

It's the first time I was asked to make one for a wedding and I wondered how useful it would really be. Wouldn't guests use their GPS or smart phone to obtain directions ? The wedding guests were of all ages and I assumed that nearly all are able to use google maps or mapquest with an address (even my technophobe mom does it). (Is this a fair assumption to make these days in the USA ?_

In the end, I had some free time, wanted to challenge myself here, agreed to do it.

 

In the end, they actually ended up not putting the map in the invitations because they forget to include the weight of the paper in estimating postage and only realized days before mailing that the map would push the weight into the next class (and significantly increasing the cost of mailing) and opted not to pay for it.

 

Instead, they'll include it in a goodie bag given to the guests (mostly out of towners) at the rehearsal dinner.

 

Had I known that earlier in the design process, I would have made some changes and would not have included a couple of the freeways to the west (where local guests from the west side of town would be coming from) and only included the roads that will be used by guests to arrive at the destinations.

 

It's to be printed in black and white, at 5x5 in card stock, with
directions to each location and addresses (for those who brought their
GPS or cell phone and wish to use them for directions and reference) on the back side
of the map.

 

Type: Mrs Eaves, to match the invitations

 

The neighborhood area for the church was really difficult to render as guests have to make multiple turns in a very short distances (4 or 5 turns within 1/2 mile), especially if they are coming from the West (I-90). Plus, the street name of the church (College) also changes !

 

(Just noticed, I have to figure out how to add this on the map, as the missing street name is very long, and wouldn't likely fit if I included next to College)

 

Src data/workflow: I had taken OSM data, edited out data that I didn't want in JOSM (osm editor), put it into a postGIS db, and then loaded it up in Tilemill.

 

Since all 3 these locations are all very close together (within 4 miles), I didn't think projection would make a big difference and tried a couple different ones but didn't see any that made any difference, so I just used web mercator 3857, which is tilemill's default (you can change the projection in tilemill but it's a bit of a hack and not for those inexperienced with tilemill). Exported it to SVG.

 

Then I opened it the SVG result in inkscape, and extended the ways so I could show features (specifically the area around the church, as well as the party center), at a greater scale than others in different areas, 

(I'm sure this practice has a name for it, but I don't know).


I'm interested to hear of techniques, methodologies that people use in this situation.

 

Eager to hear critiques and feedback !

 

 

EDIT: This post originally did not include the Map, because cartotalk doesn't accept SVG :(

Here is a PNG, click on picture to see full-size

Attached File  current.png   482.64KB   114 downloads

 

For a comparison on the scaling that I did, here at the 3 locations on a web map - http://tiles.mapbox....ap/map-ttbmxzmu



#2
Paul H

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Your post is a reminder why we stopped doing wedding maps many years ago. They seem simple at first, then you get into them and realize all the little details you need to include (guests coming from the east, the west, the airport, staying at different hotels, etc.) And then the wedding party is outraged when they learn it will cost them more than $25.



#3
Dennis McClendon

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Well, I think something might have gone wrong along the way, as the church seems to be a city gravel storage yard and the reception is being held at a bus turnaround.

 

The approach you've taken, creating an online slippy map seems more akin to programming than map-drawing.  I don't mean to disrespect that branch of cartography, but it seems a curious workflow if the finished product will go on paper, where you the user can't zoom in and out.  If you start from scratch and only draw the lines the map users will need, you can simplify things a lot, can distort scale where that's helpful, and can make the important parts stand out more:

 


Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#4
skorasaurus

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Well, I think something might have gone wrong along the way, as the church seems to be a city gravel storage yard and the reception is being held at a bus turnaround.

 

The approach you've taken, creating an online slippy map seems more akin to programming than map-drawing.  I don't mean to disrespect that branch of cartography, but it seems a curious workflow if the finished product will go on paper, where you the user can't zoom in and out.  If you start from scratch and only draw the lines the map users will need, you can simplify things a lot, can distort scale where that's helpful, and can make the important parts stand out more:

 

Sorry Dennis, there was a bit of miscommunication on both of our parts: I forgot to include a PNG of my map in original post, which addressed a couple of your concerns regarding simplicity and distorting the scale.

 

As you suggested and shown in the PNG, I had originally only drew the roads that the map users

 

The web map that I originally posted was just a comparison to my PNG to highlight where I distorted the scale.






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