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#1
François Goulet

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I just received pictures of my latest work on display.

 

I created a relief map of Haiti using a technique by Leland Brown called Texture Shading (I remember he introduced it on this forum in 2010 or so).

 

The pictures are too big to post here, but I've made a blog post to show them.

 

Texture shading

 

Obviously, it's a little late for feedback, but I'm really happy about the result... :)



#2
razornole

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Looks interesting.

 

I would like to see a higher res of a sample area if you could produce that.

 

Thanks,

kru


"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
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#3
François Goulet

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No problem!

 

It was quickly done, but that looks like this:

 

1:500,000 hypsometric tints:

HypsoTints500K.png

 

1:500,000 texture shading:

TextureShading500K.png

 

1:1,000,000 hypso tints:

HypsoTints1M.png

 

1:1,000,000 texture shading:

TextureShading1M.jpg

 

I don't remember the exact scale of the original map. With TS, you can adjust the setting to have a more generalized or precise result.



#4
razornole

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Thanks for sharing.  Is that a 30m DEM?

 

I'm working on a map where it may be the perfect application, four geologic units over large area. 

 

kru


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Strabo 22AD

#5
François Goulet

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I think it's SRTMx at 250m.

 

I tried with 90m SRTM4, but it was far too precise. There's some good example in the pdf file linked on my blog post. 

 



#6
razornole

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Thanks,

 

I went to your site the other night and followed the links from there.  Looks interesting.  I can't wait to try it out.

 

kru


"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#7
Agnar Renolen

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Just tested the method on a DEM over my local area to see how it performs on Norwegian terrainm which has a rather different texture that the ridge and spur type that we see in alpine areas. It seem to work reasonably well.

 

Then added a color ramp (green to light yellow) to the result, and then enhanced it with a hint of hillshade and water (all done in Photoshop).

 

The only critique is that it is not possible to identfy the highest peak in the area, which is near the bottom left of the image.  The mountan is just not steap enough give it the promininent feature that it deserves...

 

Attached File  shading_test.png   748.26KB   50 downloads

 

 



#8
Agnar Renolen

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Here's another test.

 

Colors are generally hypsometric (green to light yellow). Its intensity or luminosity is modulated by the texture relief, then a slight modulation with the hillshade on top.

 

Gives you a better idea where the highest mountains are, yet the valleys are clearly visible, regardless of direction.

 

Attached File  shading_test2.png   767.79KB   49 downloads



#9
François Goulet

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Gives you a better idea where the highest mountains are, yet the valleys are clearly visible, regardless of direction.

 

 

Nice!

 

That's the idea behind it, as I understand it. 

 

I must say once more that I'm only a fan of texture shading. Leland Brown should receive all the praises... ;)

 

It fitted my needs perfectly when creating my Haiti map...



#10
Leland Brown

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FYI, I've now updated the texture shading algorithm a bit to improve the look of the ridgetops, which also allows increased midtone contrast without degrading the rest of the texture shaded image. My command-line version of the software (Windows/Mac) is available as before at app.box.com/textureshading/. It also includes a few bug fixes and speed improvements.

 

In addition, Brett Casebolt of Natural Graphics has released a nice freeware application for the Mac called Terrain Texture Shader, which includes these updates as well as a preview function, optional hypsometric tints, DEM reprojection, and reading and writing of data and image files in various formats. The application can be downloaded at www.naturalgfx.com/tts.htm.


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