Jump to content

 
Photo

Base map for weather site

- - - - - weather meteo rainfall

  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,868 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

As those of you who were at NACIS know, I've been involved in making (base) maps for a number of weather websites. The latest one that I finished is this one:

Attached File  Europa_klein_v7_cartotalk.png   419.38KB   124 downloads

 

As of today it's live on http://meteox.com

 

The terrain data is an adapted version of Tom Patterson's Natural Earth (Hypsometric with shaded relief), vector data is all Natural Earth Vector. I just produce the base map, the rainfall data is layered on top of that in the web frontend. One of the major concerns is of course that there should be enough visual contrast between the base map and the rainfall data, this does limit my color choices quite a bit. In this particular case I had to stick close to the original version of the map as well, since that's what users are familiar with.

 

I'm pretty pleased with how this came out, and so is the client. However, I'm curious to hear what you all think about it, not in the least place because I just heard they want a bigger version (2250 x 2250 instead of 550 x 550 pixels) as well. That one is supposed to have roads in it too, which might be tricky in terms of color.


Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#2
Dennis McClendon

Dennis McClendon

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,083 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:map design, large-scale maps of cities
  • United States

Looks pretty nice.  I would probably experiment with the terrain looking a bit softer and the coastline edging not so prominent, but undoubtedly those were things you and the client pondered.

 

As for roads, since they're smoothly linear features, I think the eye can follow and recognize them with pretty low contrast.  So I might try cream yellow for the roads—or change the national borders to white or cream, and make the roads medium gray.


Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#3
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,868 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

Thanks Dennis, I'm afraid white and cream would get too close to the color used for the lightest rain, but I'll give it a shot. I've done multiple maps for them and so far we're using a light red for the roads. I do want to keep some sort of consistency between the various maps, although this one is a big step away from the others already due to the hypsometric terrain layer (so far we've only used a standard hillshade with a solid green overlay)


Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#4
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,868 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

And for those of you who are keeping track of this, I'm now working on much more detailed versions. Had to seriously upscale Tom Patterson's Hypsometric base map and combined it with my own shaded relief generated from higher resolution DEM's. Hope to be able to show a sample soon.


Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#5
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,868 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

Here's a small sample of the next map in the series.

Attached File  voorbeeld.jpg   155.68KB   26 downloads

 

The base map is Tom Patterson's Hypsometric map, without hillshade. The resolution needed for this particular project was about 10 times as much as that file, so I've upscaled that in small increments, then combined it with a double hillshade produced out of higher resolution DEM data. This gives you the crispness of the DEM and the colors from the hysometry. I've then tweaked the look of that hypsometry a bit and overlayed vector data, eventually compositing the whole thing in Photoshop.

 

 


Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#6
Charles Syrett

Charles Syrett

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 537 posts
  • Canada

A daring effort! I've upsampled hypso map bases before, but never by a factor of 10. Your result looks good! B)


Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com



#7
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,868 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

Thanks. The upsampling is done in 10% increments at a time, rather than in one go. This yields better results, even though I still applied some blurring afterwards to get rid of straight lines. The trick here is to use a hillshade generated from DEM data at the correct resolution. Upscaling shaded relief by such a factor is a recipe for disaster, but in this case I was lucky to find a DEM source at exactly the resolution I needed.


Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->