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Mouse or graphics tablet / digitizer for drawing maps?

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#1
martinitolove

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Hello

 

While drawing borders on maps I'm always very disappointed about how unprecisely the normal computer mouse is. Recently while googling I've encountered graphics tablets or digitizers as an alternative. Before buying one, I've decided to ask you

 

What input accessory do you use?

 

What label and model is the best one from your point of view?

 

Thank you much in advance!

 

martinitolove



#2
Hans van der Maarel

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For about 2 years now I'm using a tablet (Wacom) almost exclusively as the input device on my main computer. Still use a mouse on my other computers though.

 

The big benefit for me is in the fact that I am left-handed, use the tablet left-handed but mouse with my right hand. I simply don't have the fine motor skills for really twiddly work with my right hand, whereas with my left hand it comes naturally. The fact that I spent some time with my right arm in a sling 2 years ago certainly helps too... :rolleyes:

 

As for the size, bigger = better so get the biggest one you can afford and/or have room for.


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Red Geographics
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#3
l.jegou

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I'm also a happy user of wacom tablets. Since about a year, i'm using a tablet+screen combo called the Cintiq HD24, 24". The really big advantage is for image retouching and digitizing, it feels like a real drawing table.



#4
Freihand

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In a few days I get my third Wacom A5-tablet. I work with these since 15 years now and I'm very happy with it.

Having a bigger tablet does mean more work for your arm. Buy the biggest tablet size you need for precision but not a bigger one.

I don't need more than a A5 tablet for drawing. I use it for everything.

My mouse is only connected when a friend comes by and needs my compi.



#5
ErinGreb

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I have the small Wacom Intuos5. After suffering from wrist and shoulder pain from using a mouse, I feel no aching now, having the tablet for 3 years now. Much more fluid approach to designing, feels very natural. The small tablet works great for me, but I am a small person, so maybe if my range of motion was larger I'd want a larger tablet. I do keep the mouse around for others who are weirded out using the pen mouse.

#6
Lui

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I'm using Wacom wireless tablet with 27" monitors in very lazy pose (more horizontal then vertical). Very comfortable. Warning! If you are tired this pose tend to put you in a sleep in several minutes.






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