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#1
razornole

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Hello all,

Attached is a sample trail map that I am working on. It is not finished by any stretch of the imagination, but I am trying out new techniques (at least to me) that I was curious to see how they work.

I don't really want to explain much with this original post, as I am interested in how it is perceived. If it is not self explanatory then I will have to revisit some of my ideas.

Enjoy,
kru

Attached Files


"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#2
jrat

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Ok here is what I see. My eye is immediatly drawn to to the ONF areas of the map. I like the heavy green and black line which I assume is the boundary. When that line and the fire roads (another assumption) are together I get lost and find myself looking for the boundary for a few seconds before I realize it is underneath the road. I assume that the dashed red and dashed blue lines are the trails. I don't get what the dashed lt green(?) grey(?) lines represent. Also what is the difference between a fire road with a dashed case or solid case? I hope that helps. Overall it is nice to look at.

#3
Matthew Hampton

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I think it's gorgeous. Great work!

The only thing that pulled me off were the milage indicators, which I initially assumed were waterfall markers until I spent some time trying to figure them out. When I realized they pertained to milage and that they were bi-directional (nice!) I initially wondered which direction each referred to. I only takes a bit to follow the route and see which numbers are increasing/decreasing, but I wonder if a directional carot might help the map reader simultaneously identify them as milage and direction.

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#4
a0r

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Great, here's a little feedback...

I agree, it is very nice to look at! Nice color balance, typography is clean... Your contours+hillshade look great together (although wondering about elevation labels - TBD I'm sure...?).


I would also agree that the highway and the ONF area boundary overlap a bit too much (I noticed it first near Docker's Gap, wondering what happened to the east (?) boundary. But I like the effect, I think just nudging the black/green off the road would be helpful.

I'm guessing the small dot + line burst are viewpoints? I like that symbol....

I agree, the mileage labels are excellent - not sure if a carrot would be needed, after deciding that the numbers were in fact mileage (which a legend would certainly have cleared up), the numbers were clear enough to me.

Visually I really like this map - maybe that's why I spent so much time looking it over! :D Very curious to hear more back story!

Thanks for sharing!

#5
razornole

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Thanks for the comments.

Seems like I am one Ozark National Forest label away from understanding the forest boundary. That is an oversight on my behalf.

A legend would help clarify the roads. In a nutshell they are based on the classification system put in place by the forest service.

Seems like there is some confusion with the Special Interest Areas. They are similar to wilderness areas only on a much smaller scale. No prescribed burns, new roads, or logging.

This map is a mock up for my client, I've also done another at 1:35k (this 1:50k). We decide on scale Sunday. Contours will be indexed, but that was too much work for a mock up. Same could be said with a legend. This is a geographic coordinate system so no UTM grid. All that stuff will be on the final map/s.

Thanks,
kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#6
mfarmer

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That's a beautiful map. The only thing that I saw as a distraction was the county boundary. Do you need it?

#7
rudy

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What about contour labels? And what are those tan areas supposed to indicate? Otherwsie, it looks great.

#8
Dennis McClendon

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I find it distracting to have the most important lines be dashed. Why can't the trail be a continuous red line?
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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#9
razornole

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@farmer: The counties are very important. Not only do they correspond with the county roads, but we are getting funding from several counties in which the trail traverses. I would agree that this mock up map is over labeled with the county's name but I like things in three, just the artist in me.

@rudy: This map is a mock up to determine the final scale, too much work in indexing the isohypse. Good catch with the tan, that is why I posted this up. They are fields/pastures, I wanted to test their effectiveness. Of course that would be stated on the legend. That is what I am really testing here are my rasters.

@Dennis: I always dash my trails, it adds a roughness/texture. Furthermore, 9 out of 10 times I dash it with the color of the blaze. Didn't do that with my side trails which are blazed blue, but I may try to reverse them to see how white solid with a blue dash would work? edit: just did that and I love the effect, thanks. I find it a success if the most important element is highest in the VH.

Thanks,
kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD




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