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Labeling concern

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#1
ebHunter

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Hello,

As a student finishing up my first semester of cartography, there are obviously still many conventions that I am unsure of how to handle, so hopefully I can receive some advice:

I'm working on a choropleth map of Europe with a very dark grey background and lighter grey countries. When labeling Denmark, I really want to place the country name across the country and not in the North Sea. However, the size of my map prohibits me from being able to fit the entire name in the country, so the D and K are outside the boundaries and on the very dark grey background. I made the D and K white while leaving the middle 'enmar' black. It appears readable and the location is much better there than anywhere else. The eye almost doesn't even recognize the differing contrasts, but is this an absolute no-no? I like it, but I have a feeling I'm breaking a giant cartographic rule.

Thanks for any input or suggestions!

#2
Hans van der Maarel

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Can you post an image?
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#3
Dennis McClendon

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There aren't very many cartographic rules. Well, almost none that are capital offenses. ^_^

Without seeing it, a complete change from black to white strikes me as a bit drastic. Other things to try: can you halo the D and the K? Would a medium gray (50% black) work on both the light and the dark backgrounds? Can the label be angled or curved to fit within the country?
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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#4
M.Denil

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A complete change from black to white can be done.
The attached map shows one example.
also seen at
http://www.cepf.net/...es/default.aspx

In this case, there is no ambiguity about whether the names are continous words.
large letterspaces, for example, would not work with the color change.

In this case, there is a clear, visually logical reason for the color to change, and
there are no other confusing aspects of the lettering, so the words can hand together
despite the sudden color change in mid-name.

I think there were some maps in this set where the color of a name even changed in the middle of a letter...
but, again, a dramatic change like that precluded allowing any other potentially ambigious element,
effect, or proximity.

Attached Files



#5
ebHunter

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Thanks for the information. My map was due the next day after I submitted my first post, so in the time it took to be validated, I had to make my own decision. I ended up playing it safe and placing the country name right above the country where there's a little nook in which it fits.

I received an A on my map, so perhaps my safe judgment payed off this time.

Thanks, all!




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