Jump to content

 
Photo

Topographic Hachures

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#16
Charles Syrett

Charles Syrett

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 537 posts
  • Canada

Looks pretty impressive, Hans! B) I'm dying to take a closer look.....can you give us a zoom so we can see the hachures a little better?

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com


Been tinkering with it some more tonight and lo and behold!

This is actually starting to look a bit like the real thing I think. It's far from perfect still, but there's definately progress. I do find there is a subtle relationship between the size (line width/length) and scale.

This was done in VNS 3.01, using a strip texture which has its width driven by a greyscale image I prepared earlier (a standard lit-from-top-left hillshade).



#17
François Goulet

François Goulet

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 688 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Mille-Isles, Qc
  • Interests:Cartography, History, Graphic Design and almost everything else...
  • Canada

Looks pretty impressive, Hans! B) I'm dying to take a closer look.....can you give us a zoom so we can see the hachures a little better?
http://www.mapgraphics.com


Yeah! Right now, you're just teasing us! :P

#18
MapMedia

MapMedia

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,029 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Davis, California
  • United States

Been tinkering with it some more tonight and lo and behold!



This is actually starting to look a bit like the real thing I think. It's far from perfect still, but there's definately progress. I do find there is a subtle relationship between the size (line width/length) and scale.

This was done in VNS 3.01, using a strip texture which has its width driven by a greyscale image I prepared earlier (a standard lit-from-top-left hillshade).


Well done! Of course that's the benefit of having VNS handy.

#19
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,891 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

A zoomed in bit of the previous sample:

Attached File  hachures_test3.jpg   134.42KB   69 downloads

The direction of the hachures is driven by the slope aspect, but it seems there's something funny going on around the rim. I thought I had it done properly, but I ended up shifting the curve driving the direction 25% back and this is what I came up with:

Attached File  hachures_test4.jpg   131.17KB   81 downloads

I think the second one is slightly better (though still not perfect). I also toned down the size of the hachures for that one.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#20
bentley

bentley

    Newbie

  • Validated Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Athens
  • United States

One of the guys at ESRI had done some research a few years ago on automating hachuring, but it never got to a useable state.

The best paper I know of describing an automation algorithm was done by Nicolas Regnauld - "Automated relief representation for visualisation of archaeological monuments and other anthropogenic forms", published in Computers, Environment and Urban Systems 26. I don't think it's available as an online resource. I'll ping Nicolas and point him at this thread to see if he has anything to offer.


There's a copy on a personal page of the University of Edingurgh: http://www.geos.ed.ac.uk/homes/wam/

Now, if it's protected, someone should tell the author...




Thanks, This looks great! I can't wait to read it.

#21
bentley

bentley

    Newbie

  • Validated Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Athens
  • United States

Hello fellow hachure enthusiasts!
I developed a nice hand drawn technique, the result of which falls somewhere between the overly generalized caterpillars and very detailed Lehmann methods. I have attached an example. It is a work in progress, so I would be happy to receive some critique on the overall design….
Curious how…?
I began by printing a slope classified DEM and tracing the aspect angles as a general guide in pencil. Then I developed a set of faux hachured mountains on a different page and, by moving the tracing paper back and forth between the DEM and the faux mountains, I matched the mountain I thought suited the slope and aspect best and traced it for the final map. It is wise to use a VERY fine crowquill pen, this way you can get varying widths in each hachure and don’t develop any unsightly blobs of ink. Also, check out razornole’s Nez Perce maps, I drew on his methods, but left Illy out of the process (Sorry Illy and thanks again Kru!).
The final product is an extremely generalized rendering of the topography (not nearly as skillful as something Lehmann himself would have drawn), but I think it, at very least, is akin to something this era would have produced. And, I must happily say, it has that really historic (kind of totally inaccurate and silly) look I don’t believe can be achieved through automated methods (please someone tell me I am wrong).
Anyway, for anyone who loves drawing and is looking for the real historic mapping experience, this is certainly a method to explore

Attached Files



#22
François Goulet

François Goulet

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 688 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Mille-Isles, Qc
  • Interests:Cartography, History, Graphic Design and almost everything else...
  • Canada

I developed a nice hand drawn technique, the result of which falls somewhere between the overly generalized caterpillars and very detailed Lehmann methods. I have attached an example. It is a work in progress, so I would be happy to receive some critique on the overall design….


It's a pretty cool technique and I love the style of you map! I can't wait to have a free evening to jump in the "hachuring" myself! ;)

Thanks for sharing!

#23
DaveB

DaveB

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,055 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Redlands, CA
  • United States

Hello fellow hachure enthusiasts!
The final product is an extremely generalized rendering of the topography (not nearly as skillful as something Lehmann himself would have drawn), but I think it, at very least, is akin to something this era would have produced. And, I must happily say, it has that really historic (kind of totally inaccurate and silly) look I don’t believe can be achieved through automated methods (please someone tell me I am wrong).
Anyway, for anyone who loves drawing and is looking for the real historic mapping experience, this is certainly a method to explore


Interesting, nice work, although it makes it look like there are various plateaus/steps/levels. Is that what the terrain looks like?

I think the point is people are looking for automated/computer-generated methods. Manual methods exist, but they are labor-intensive and take lots of practice and skill to do well.

When life gives you Lehmanns make hachures. :rolleyes:
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->