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#1
WendyA

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Hi .. I am new to the world of map making...
My first effort is shown here if interested ( http://www.cartotalk...?showtopic=8473 )

As I am setting out from a standing start, I believe asking (experienced) peoples opinion to get me started off on the right foot. Partly to avoid costly mistakes, but also as I am new I don't know 'where we're at' as regards technological advances in the map industry.

My initial design was meant as a printed map, to be distributed and sold mainly in Europe initially. At a later stage I was thinking of an App version.

However, I sought the advice of a reputable/successful print map maker before going ahead (he specializes in Walking Maps and has been in the business for 25 years.) We had a very interesting discussion.
Basically he said, The printed map is dead. Digital is the future/way to go!'

As I do not want to waste time and as important - money in forging ahead with a printed version if it is not going to sell.... I just wanted to throw this topic open here and see what people think.

I personally see room for both mediums, but I also need to think before going ahead and slashing the cash (which is limited, so his idea of a free App platform such as http://www.viewranger.com would be a good start - Although I notice this is more for the outdoor specialist and my map is a driving map and also includes local street maps. On this specific point, can anyone recommend any similar outfits to the viewranger where I could place my digital version for no cash outlay. Thanks in advance.)

PS - In another post the Amazon 40 copies format was mentioned.

#2
Kalai Selvan

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Thats correct paper maps are getting absolete and everything is going digital.

Thanks and Regards
Kalai Selvan


#3
Hans van der Maarel

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Thats correct paper maps are getting absolete and everything is going digital.


I disagree, while there is a big move to go digital with a lot of products, and paper has taken a big hit, I think there will remain a market for paper maps (or other physical map products).

On the other hand, digital does bring a lot of advantages. I've read "Map Addict", which documents the Ordnance Survey quite well, and according to its author some less popular UK topo maps sell an astoundingly low amount of copies per year (numbers in the 10s were mentioned, maybe even lower than that). If you print those on paper, you're going to take a big loss on the printing cost. Digitally, it would still be difficult to totally recoup the production cost, but it's much more achievable.
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#4
antoniolocandro

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I saw your post and you are mainly looking to sell your map to people using it to drive around and explore your city. I would say that a paper map would be something you would sell at a store or need to ship which could make the overhead costs larger, you can still sell the paper maps but it will require a little bit more effort. The cost 6,50 euros will mean you would have to sell a lot of the paper maps to recover the costs been that Europe is by far not cheap

Digital maps gives you the advantage of selling online, through your own website or through stores like ebay, amazon, avenza, etc. If you make your maps in a standard printer size I would actually buy the digital file and print it to take it with me, however digital copies have a problem and its piracy, I guess there is no easy answer.

By the way I say you added business names on the map, you could get some of the stores to advertise with you on the map and sell ad space to print a first edition and see what happens

Hi .. I am new to the world of map making...
My first effort is shown here if interested ( http://www.cartotalk...?showtopic=8473 )

As I am setting out from a standing start, I believe asking (experienced) peoples opinion to get me started off on the right foot. Partly to avoid costly mistakes, but also as I am new I don't know 'where we're at' as regards technological advances in the map industry.

My initial design was meant as a printed map, to be distributed and sold mainly in Europe initially. At a later stage I was thinking of an App version.

However, I sought the advice of a reputable/successful print map maker before going ahead (he specializes in Walking Maps and has been in the business for 25 years.) We had a very interesting discussion.
Basically he said, The printed map is dead. Digital is the future/way to go!'

As I do not want to waste time and as important - money in forging ahead with a printed version if it is not going to sell.... I just wanted to throw this topic open here and see what people think.

I personally see room for both mediums, but I also need to think before going ahead and slashing the cash (which is limited, so his idea of a free App platform such as http://www.viewranger.com would be a good start - Although I notice this is more for the outdoor specialist and my map is a driving map and also includes local street maps. On this specific point, can anyone recommend any similar outfits to the viewranger where I could place my digital version for no cash outlay. Thanks in advance.)

PS - In another post the Amazon 40 copies format was mentioned.



#5
François Goulet

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Paper is not dead. But I think it's true that it will be harder to sell and I could be more difficult for small companies to make and sell them.

Digital has the advantage of being able to locate you on a map in a second or two and data can be update easily. But I find them myself not very practical to navigate as I love to have the "great picture" which I can't have on a 4" screen, and I can't see myself navigating with an iPad in hand.

Maps.com Map Marketplace could be a good start. It's a print-on-demand service for maps. No need to print in advance! Never tried it, but it could worth a look.

#6
Michael Karpovage

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Printed maps certainly aren't dead. My printed Savannah Historic District Illustrated Map is coveted by tourists who love doing a walking tour and holding a map in their hands that folds open into an 18x27" poster. They get sucked into it like a magnet. And some buy the map to frame and hang on their wall. Like François said, you can't get that same "big picture" impact on a hand held device. Especially when you lose connection or your battery is low.

I'm not discounting digital maps at all. In fact, I'm working on an interactive App for my Savannah map right now. I recognize there is a market for digital, but paper is not dead. That's too much of a generalized statement for all maps since maps come in all different varieties and functions. You must look at your map as a product to fit a market. What's its functionality, purpose, usage? Driving map from point A to B or tourism map for personal exploration and adventure? Two different entities. Look what your competitors are doing too. Observe people with maps, talk to them. They are the end-user. Get their feedback as they would be the ones buying your product.

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www.karpovagecreative.com/savannah

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www.mapofthieves.com





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