Jump to content

 
Photo

Magic Grid reload


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1
VolksNav

VolksNav

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • No Country Selected

Hi everybody,

here am I again, this time with good news for those who are interested on business. All visitors of the NACIS 2012 will have the opportunity to FEEL the difference between today’s orientation tools and Magic Grid.

I’ll perform the magic during the session “ORIENTING THE USER” and also during 3 days within the gallery. Using the same trick – practiced by soldiers, boy scouts, blind people, pilots etc. for more than 100 years - , I’ll answer the following questions:

- where is Portland?
- where is Double Tree? www.volksnav.de/NACIS2012
- where is the gallery? www.volksnav.de/DoubleTree
- where is my tripod?

Anyone who can read a clock will be able to learn this trick within few minutes once in a life time. She/he will be able e. g. to find the toilet with simple brain work. On emergency situations, this person will have better survival chances. Imagine you’re a passenger of the Titanic: would you everywhere there be able to understand the loudspeaker command “run to the boat 23”?

Besides: the title of the session is a confirmation that actual orientation tools neglect the consumer. On my first topic I’ve missed any comments to the characteristics in favor of those who should read maps. I’m sure, this time this will change, so I repeat the question

“why not be a Cartist ?" www.volksnav.de/theCartist

Henrique
volksnav@volksnav.de

#2
Adam Wilbert

Adam Wilbert

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 273 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bellingham, WA, USA
  • United States

I saw that on the program and will admit to being a little intrigued, having remembered the prior thread on the topic here on CartoTalk. On the program you mentioned navigating Rio de Janeiro using the statue as a guidepost, moving in, or out, clockwise and counter clockwise. And that makes perfect sense to me. I do the same thing around my town and county using Mt. Baker as my reference. I'm sure others do as well with their local celebrity mountain. I'm even reminded of playing the video game L.A. Noire, which is set in a historically accurate recreation of 1940's Los Angeles. From almost anywhere in the city, you could spot the tower of City Hall, and it made it really easy to find your way from point to point. Where I think it falls apart is in the arbitrary nature of the chosen center point of your grid. I'm also curious as to how it works indoors, navigating the hotel for example. I guess I'll find out!

Adam Wilbert
CartoGaia.com & AdamWilbert.com
Lynda.com author of "Up and Running with ArcGIS"


#3
VolksNav

VolksNav

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • No Country Selected

Hello Adam,

thank you for the confirmation that the navigation around a pole is the more natural one.

Concerning the centering point: when we enter a city name on GE, the zoom stops on an arbitrary point. Who defines this? Programers? The Cartist only makes one or two wise proposals, the decision should be taken by the MARKET, that means, authorities AND users.

I’m proposing events like “Occupy your StatusQuo” in slums in Brazil, Kenya and India. There residents themselves would define the own house number www.volksnav.de/HouseNumber, so they can call a pizza or sell the “property” which today has no address.

To understand the simple information “Bellingham SW”, it takes a lot of time to discover where is what: there is no common N/S and E/W jump point. Why don’t you just propose

www.volksnav.de/Bellingham
www.volksnav.de/Bellingham/Bellingham.kml

to the city administration as my agent? Bellingham still could conquer the prestige to be world’s first one with natural orientation.

Henrique

#4
Dennis McClendon

Dennis McClendon

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,079 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:map design, large-scale maps of cities
  • United States

Sometimes it is helpful to know a little bit about a place before proposing solutions. Bellingham's streets are in alphabetical order! Like virtually every other city in the American West, addresses are Cartesian.

The actual problems of navigation in Bellingham—knowing which streets are one-way, which streets don't cross the river or freeway—aren't solved by introducing a new polar addressing scheme.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#5
Adam Wilbert

Adam Wilbert

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 273 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bellingham, WA, USA
  • United States

The actual problems of navigation in Bellingham—knowing which streets are one-way, which streets don't cross the river or freeway—aren't solved by introducing a new polar addressing scheme.


That's the truth. I5 just plows through the middle of town with little regard for cross connections, even though street names jump the divide. It's like that in lots of older cities that have multiple layers of conflicting infrastructure plans. I used the word "navigation" when I probably should have said "orientation." I don't think a radial grid is a terrible idea, in fact its a really old idea for development plans, but I do think it's folly to try and lay that on top of existing networks. You'd have to plan the city for it from the start to make it work.

Adam Wilbert
CartoGaia.com & AdamWilbert.com
Lynda.com author of "Up and Running with ArcGIS"


#6
VolksNav

VolksNav

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • No Country Selected

Hi Dennis,

there is a misunderstanding: I’m just proposing a layer with some simple lines and circles (instead of none) mainly for those who think that they can’t read maps, see www.volksnav.de/mapDanger.

The target is not to improve street names but to be better than competitors like Google and OSM proposing maps with additional information, so e. g. making possible a reform and harmonization of the post codes. Shouldn’t be the user the one who decides if such lines (and codes) are helpful or if he prefers to ignore them and use the Mt. Baker to get an answer for the next fundamental questions?

- am I driving/walking downtown or out of town? To east or to west?

- is the target on map in front, left hand, right hand or behind and how far?

“Alphabetical street names” sounds good but there is no convention for them concerning directions: inside to outside?, NW to SE? / snake form possible? etc. During 9/11, additional panic arised because the helpers didn't know which one was the tower 1 or 2. Is this a good addressing?

Wouldn’t it be a better world if we don't always have to worry about the street orientation but can rapidly find the best crossing/station/bridge on map AND on reality and continue navigating through house numbers, also in China www.MinZhongDaoHang.de? We only woud ask/read the pole, all cardinal points, directions and distances would be identical. With this, it would be easier e. g. for me to book a hotel in Portland www.volksnav.de/search. When we book a flight to London, often we’ll first have to choose one of four airports. But where are they? Airport codes would be the quickest answer. Acc. to www.ManausOnline.com (click Turismo/Pontos turisticos), touristic attractions are addressed acc. to the Munich Orientation Convention.

Maps would also be helpful if targets are outside of the map, e. g. ChicagoCarto, 30 East Adams:
http://www.cartotalk.../attach_add.png
The information “m9” means always “from pole to sunset”, even if you rotate the smaller map 1 “hour” to later (+1h).

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if cartographers – and not telecoms, yellow pages etc. - would be the licensors of such innovations in your region? Why should cartographers be mere paper suppliers?

Attached Files



#7
VolksNav

VolksNav

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • No Country Selected

I'm sorry, because of an accident, my doctor recommended to avoid long flight journeys. Remark: the accident didn't happen within the actual Oktoberfest :-).

Nevertheless, anyone who is interested on this innovation is invited to contact me. Thank you in advance.

Henrique
volksnav@volksnav.de

#8
Strebe

Strebe

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 76 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Map projections. Snobby chocolate. Science in general.
  • United States

I'm sorry, because of an accident, my doctor recommended to avoid long flight journeys.

Henrique
volksnav@volksnav.de


Unfortunate. Best wishes for your convalescence.

-- daan Strebe




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->