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#1
max4490

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Hi,

I've been asked to make a heritage related map by a family friend. I'm a geomatics graduate so I more or less know what I'm doing. However, I intend to use Google Earth and was wondering what the copyright implications of this is. It would just be a case of using the satellite imagery as a base and overlaying the bits and pieces that I want.

Seen as I will be getting paid for my work do I have to upgrade to Google Earth Pro or pay Google some sort of royalties?

Could use some help on this as I can't find anything concrete on the net.

Thanks,

Max

#2
frax

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You have to look at this link: http://www.google.co...guidelines.html
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#3
GeoEvan

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Luckily Google has set up that site to explain it in this case. But as a general rule of thumb, you should assume that you are NOT legally permitted to reproduce anyone else's maps unless they explicitly say that you can. In the U.S. and probably many other countries, copyright protection is given by default to any creative work, even if it doesn't say "copyright" anywhere on it.

This applies even if you're not making any money off of the project, though if it's just for personal use usually no one will notice, and most people won't care (note that putting it on a website doesn't necessarily count as personal use). Some countries' laws (such as those of the U.S.) also have "fair use" exceptions for certain specific types of use, such as in a classroom or for creating a parody - but NOT just for any use that you feel is fair. The rules are not always clearly defined though, so if you're doing something on a large scale it's worth seeking legal advice.
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#4
max4490

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Thanks,

So this would apply to the satellite imagery as well and not just the maps? As a last resort I guess I can use open source data from the OS ect. but I would prefer to use satellite imagery.

Max

#5
GeoEvan

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Yes, copyright applies equally to photographs as to maps, books, etc. But you'll have to check the Google link for their specific policy.
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#6
antoniolocandro

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I would suggest you start by visiting Ordnance Survey UK for Open data, and check what you can use. I wouldn't pay for Google Earth Pro, used to do that and not many benefits. I will suspect Open Source data of the UK would be pretty much ok, and Ordnance Survey data is quite good.

I am assuming you are doing this for the UK

Hi,

I've been asked to make a heritage related map by a family friend. I'm a geomatics graduate so I more or less know what I'm doing. However, I intend to use Google Earth and was wondering what the copyright implications of this is. It would just be a case of using the satellite imagery as a base and overlaying the bits and pieces that I want.

Seen as I will be getting paid for my work do I have to upgrade to Google Earth Pro or pay Google some sort of royalties?

Could use some help on this as I can't find anything concrete on the net.

Thanks,

Max






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