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My first cartography project as a freelancer.


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#1
aqua_marine

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I am working on my very first cartography project as a freelancer. I am mapping out a person's property. The house and the plot are represented as part of the shapefile, and I was able to create a new map with the property by itself. I am at a hard part. I have two questions:

1) How do I put in a representation of trees? I am trying to find some kind of file to represent trees on the property.
2) How much should I charge?What would normally be charged?

#2
Charles Syrett

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Representation of trees: This depends on scale. Presumably, since this is a map of a property, the scale will be fairly large. In that case a site plan style, or CAD style, of trees may be appropriate. Do a search on CAD trees; I've found lots of nicely-designed trees this way, and if they're in dwg or dxf you can open them in AI and restyle them. You can even distinguish broadleaf and needleleaf trees with different icons. To get style ideas, do an image search on site plans. Have fun, get inspired.

What to charge: Figure out how many hours you think the project will take. Multiply by a reasonable hourly rate. Then quote to the client. If the client balks, then work it out. That's the basic process, and it's how I've done it for decades. B)

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com

#3
Dennis McClendon

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"Mapping out a person's property" sounds a lot like surveying, which calls for more precision than found in the usual shapefile from a local government. If you're in a modern subdivision where the cadastral data came from the original subdivision survey's coordinate geometry or CAD file, you might be fine. But if your client is expecting accuracy to half a foot and you're just taking shapefiles that the county digitized in 1994 by looking at two-foot accuracy aerial orthophotos, you may be introducing false accuracy and creating big problems for yourself and your client.

In addition, you can sometimes run afoul of state laws requiring that this kind of work be done only by licensed surveyors. Make sure your client doesn't think you're providing a survey of his property, but only a sketch map.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#4
aqua_marine

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"Mapping out a person's property" sounds a lot like surveying, which calls for more precision than found in the usual shapefile from a local government. If you're in a modern subdivision where the cadastral data came from the original subdivision survey's coordinate geometry or CAD file, you might be fine. But if your client is expecting accuracy to half a foot and you're just taking shapefiles that the county digitized in 1994 by looking at two-foot accuracy aerial orthophotos, you may be introducing false accuracy and creating big problems for yourself and your client.

In addition, you can sometimes run afoul of state laws requiring that this kind of work be done only by licensed surveyors. Make sure your client doesn't think you're providing a survey of his property, but only a sketch map.


I have let him know that it isn't a survey. He just needs something representing the trees on his yard.

#5
aqua_marine

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I've thought about something else. I'm considering importing my ArcGIS work into Google Earth. I need to know the legal ramifications of this. Will I get sued? Will I go to prison? Is it legal?

I'm more worried about the legal part rather than the technical part.

#6
Dennis McClendon

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Why would there be a legal concern? Are you using a dataset that has restrictions on it?
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#7
Kalai Selvan

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First thing do what you are thinking, later ask queries, if at all someone sues you..lol



I've thought about something else. I'm considering importing my ArcGIS work into Google Earth. I need to know the legal ramifications of this. Will I get sued? Will I go to prison? Is it legal?

I'm more worried about the legal part rather than the technical part.


Thanks and Regards
Kalai Selvan


#8
karas

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Why do you need Google Earth? ArcMap has some tree symbols (top view) in the Environmental style reference if you want to digitize each tree. Or you can pull in one of the Esri online basemaps and digitize the tree line from the aerial imagery. You didn't say how many trees you need to show.

If you do use Google Earth for some reason, read the terms and conditions. They may not allow it to be used for commercial reasons (especially the free version). Would they find out? Unlikely but watch out for karma :)




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