Jump to content

 
Photo

Samara Metro and Tram Map

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1
whiters

whiters

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Russia
  • Russian Federation

Hello everybody!

This is proposed map of rapid rail transit in Samara (Russia) for subway car (size A4). I would like to see your opinion and constructive criticism. Should I make any corrections in english text of map legend and translate names of tram stops? Thank you!

Posted Image
------------------
Andrew Whiters.

#2
razornole

razornole

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 450 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ozark Plateau, Arkansas
  • Interests:Photography, Cartography, Down-river canoeing, Backpacking, Cross country biking, Geomorphology, Ornithology, Ecology, Quaternary, and last but first; drinking beer on the beach.
  • United States

Hello everybody!

This is proposed map of rapid rail transit in Samara (Russia) for subway car (size A4). I would like to see your opinion and constructive criticism. Should I make any corrections in english text of map legend and translate names of tram stops? Thank you!

Posted Image


Hello Andrew,

I like the clean simple design. It is pretty easy to read.

I was a little confused on your use of arrows. It is not obvious on the Metro line that the arrows represent the exit direction. I though it told me which direction the metro traveled.

You have used arrows on the Tram line, and I still haven't figured them out. What do they represent?

What does the text/number mean when it is not knocked-out (or in a block).

Just from a design style, I would like to see all the text in the legend on that white background. You've got about 3/4 characters hanging over.

Thanks for sharing,
kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#3
whiters

whiters

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Russia
  • Russian Federation

kru, thank you for feedback!

I was a little confused on your use of arrows. It is not obvious on the Metro line that the arrows represent the exit direction. I though it told me which direction the metro traveled.


Yeah, it's a bit confusing... The customer wants to show exit direction from the station. Maybe just depict small white points instead of arrows?

You have used arrows on the Tram line, and I still haven't figured them out. What do they represent?


It's a travel direction of the tram route (when it goes one-way). For example, route # 20k goes one-way loop on south-west and travel back to the start point. # 4 - outer circular route, #23 - inner circular route.

What does the text/number mean when it is not knocked-out (or in a block).


Blue and red numbers in a block are terminal for tram route, when aren't knocked-out they show the travel course of the route.

Just from a design style, I would like to see all the text in the legend on that white background. You've got about 3/4 characters hanging over.


Agree. But this version of legend is the customer's choice.
------------------
Andrew Whiters.

#4
Gretchen Peterson

Gretchen Peterson

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 238 posts
  • United States

"Mode operation of tram routes" should be "Mode of operation of tram routes".

#5
Dennis McClendon

Dennis McClendon

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,080 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:map design, large-scale maps of cities
  • United States

This is one of the most difficult design problems in cartography. It's almost impossible for the user to figure out which tram goes where unless he does a treasure hunt from number group to number group. A couple of thoughts:
  • I find curved corners to be an aid in following tram and bus routes. There are junctions on this map where it would clarify that all tram lines turn the same way, for instance.
  • Sometimes it's useful to selectively separate routes onto their own line. For instance, if a route that's most east-west uses a north-south street for only 500m, give it its own line so you can easily see it converge and then diverge. Check the examples on my downtown Chicago bus map.
  • You could put the colors in a little hierarchy to help explain them and so the casual user could ignore certain routes. Keep full-time routes and route numbers in dark blue, but put weekday only in a medium blue and rush hour only in a blue-green. A street served only by rush-hour routes would then get a blue-green line, while most of the streets will have a dark blue line that "wins."
  • Gray is one way to separate the English from the Russian text, but I wonder if a spring-green would work a little better. Whatever you choose, be sure to check that it's readable under the local streetlights at night.
Just cheat a little bit with the north bank of the Volga to keep the legend text from hanging into the water. No one is using this map to navigate the waterway.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#6
whiters

whiters

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Russia
  • Russian Federation

Gertchen, thank you for correction!

Dennis, your advices are priceless :) I took a lot of them. The rest I'll take into account for the future for my next large scaled map of entire Samara public transit network. ;)

Here's the result (but it have to be approved by customer :huh: )

Posted Image

I got a question... Should I translate the Russian names of tram stops (for example, "Chapaevskaya ulitsa") into English ("Chapaevskaya street") or just leave transliteration like it sounds in Russian? In this case "ulitsa" means "street".
------------------
Andrew Whiters.

#7
Dennis McClendon

Dennis McClendon

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,080 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:map design, large-scale maps of cities
  • United States

No, don't translate. The Cyrillic matches what it says on the tram stop sign, and the English transliteration helps the non-Cyrillic reader figure out what's he's hearing said by locals or on the tram announcements. Any traveler brave enough to take a tram in Russia will have already figured out the words for street, taxi, how much, thank you, and beer.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#8
whiters

whiters

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Russia
  • Russian Federation

No, don't translate. The Cyrillic matches what it says on the tram stop sign, and the English transliteration helps the non-Cyrillic reader figure out what's he's hearing said by locals or on the tram announcements. Any traveler brave enough to take a tram in Russia will have already figured out the words for street, taxi, how much, thank you, and beer.


Thank you, Dennis! My doubts disappeared- I thought the same way :)
------------------
Andrew Whiters.

#9
cyl_n

cyl_n

    Newbie

  • Validated Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Australia

Am I too late? I like the design, its nice and neat and clean. It is a bit difficult to see what direction the trams are going though. Just one thought, is it colour blind accessible? I had to change a bunch of maps for the web to meet colour blind accessibility and for a tram network it would probably be more important.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->