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#1
EOSGIS

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This one, is about Americo Vespucio and his voyages. The classic appearance was achieved using a Robinson Projection.Today everyone sees elsewhere the Mercator one, so, just using a projection that looks spherical simplifies the problem to give that "anient" look.
I always used some textures for the paper, some special typos, and a"gold" tone to all the map and colors.
I applied a hacthure photoshop filter to the seas near the coast to get that engarver mapwork.

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#2
DaveB

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Also interesting and cool. I like the various effects and the typefaces you've used.
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek

#3
stephenramirezzz

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Great stuff, these are all really cool.

#4
EOSGIS

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Great stuff, these are all really cool.

Thank you

#5
tofufriend

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Bellisima! did you manually painted the topography? (mountains) what software did you use?

#6
Gretchen Peterson

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Very nice! The subtle drop-shadows beneath the route lines are unique and effective.

#7
EOSGIS

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In this case the shaded relief was not done by hand. The topography is a shaded relief done with Sufer software and then some retouching, filters etc....

Bellisima! did you manually painted the topography? (mountains) what software did you use?



#8
EOSGIS

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Thnk you. I use these type of shadowing in several of my maps. Most times to the arrows and texts, so the shaded relief underneath makes them appear as if they were thrown by sun. Just a perception trick by overlaping the shadow of the lines and the shaded relief


Very nice! The subtle drop-shadows beneath the route lines are unique and effective.



#9
Max Olson

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Very nice. Big fan of historic maps.

Excuse my ignorance -- first time poster new to cartography/GIS -- but what software was this map originally created in? Is it created in a GIS program then eventually transported into Photoshop? If so, are the paths/arrows GIS data or added afterward?

#10
BioGeoMan

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I like it!

Michael Scisco

BioGeoCreations
Albuquerque, NM

505-603-3636
biogeocreations.com


#11
EOSGIS

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Hello Max,
Thank you. Yes, the arrows are place with adobe illustrator, as well as the texts etc... Gis or Science cartographic systems usually dont allow to control "artistic" side of maps easily.
Best regards
Fernando


Very nice. Big fan of historic maps.

Excuse my ignorance -- first time poster new to cartography/GIS -- but what software was this map originally created in? Is it created in a GIS program then eventually transported into Photoshop? If so, are the paths/arrows GIS data or added afterward?



#12
EOSGIS

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Thank you Michael

I like it!



#13
P Riggs

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Excellent job!

I like your choice of projection, too. It really gives it a nice, professional, artistic touch.

The way you blend the backgrounds of paper and map together is very effective, too.
Philip Riggs
Decorative-Maps.com

#14
Strebe

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This one, is about Americo Vespucio and his voyages. The classic appearance was achieved using a Robinson Projection.Today everyone sees elsewhere the Mercator one, so, just using a projection that looks spherical simplifies the problem to give that "anient" look.


This is one case where a Mercator might even be preferred. I would like to see the actual courses Vespucci sailed. On a Mercator one can easily see the course corrections against rhumbs. Of course I understand that we likely do not have enough information about those courses.

Any reasonable projection you might use would be an anachronism for Vespucci, of course. The Robinson is similar to the oval projection Ortelius popularized later in the 16th century, so I can see how its use might contribute to an antique feel.

Regards,
— daan Strebe

#15
EOSGIS

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Hello strebe
In this map, the selected projection does not have anything to do with accurate rumbs or vespucci data.
It was just selected because of "stylism" , page composition, communication with the audience... it was selected because it allows to draw a "sphere shade" and at the same time fills the sheet of paper. Also because it maintains north an south without too much distorsion (mercator doesnt). The map does not want to show any loxodromics, geodesics, ... nor any real measurable data. As you say, vespucci's rumbs are surely unknown.
If for this map we would need to make a real navigatin approach as in xv or xvi century, we should begin using a rumbs map based projection (mercator was not even used) the rumbs based in Hierro meridian as origin and using "winds roses" with different origins.
For intance, the map is inspired more in a xviii map than in a map from the xv century, which ussualy has a "hard look".
The maps i present here are 60% mathematical cartography and the rest is stylism for the reader and information made by historians for the map.
I can know a lot about projections, maths, geodesy and use them to begin the maps... BUT the readers and clients dont want technical maps. For instance these maps are carthographicaly perfect but just " adorned"
A cartographer has to communicate too... a map which is not read by anyone is a death map. just as music which is not listened ;-)

This one, is about Americo Vespucio and his voyages. The classic appearance was achieved using a Robinson Projection.Today everyone sees elsewhere the Mercator one, so, just using a projection that looks spherical simplifies the problem to give that "anient" look.


This is one case where a Mercator might even be preferred. I would like to see the actual courses Vespucci sailed. On a Mercator one can easily see the course corrections against rhumbs. Of course I understand that we likely do not have enough information about those courses.

Any reasonable projection you might use would be an anachronism for Vespucci, of course. The Robinson is similar to the oval projection Ortelius popularized later in the 16th century, so I can see how its use might contribute to an antique feel.

Regards,
— daan Strebe






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