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#1
David Medeiros

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I have a map job for a simple world map with global expedition route that will be printed across two pages in a magazine. Any advice on projections for this kind of layout? We want to minimize loss of readable map in the seam, so I may actually give the map a very small, hopefully unnoticeable, overlap there.

The publishers are thinking Galls Stereographic. Any better options? I have MAPublisher so have easy access to all of their projections.

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#2
Strebe

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Is it a single route you need to display? What is that route? What are the proportions of the space the map will occupy?

Best,
— daan Strebe

#3
David Medeiros

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Is it a single route you need to display? What is that route? What are the proportions of the space the map will occupy?

Best,
— daan Strebe


It's a series of routes that span the globe. Think auto route across every major continent. The map will be the entire world and spread across two typical magazine pages. The current plan is to create two hemispherical maps in Galls Stereographic, one for each page. I may also mock up a more typical global map with the page seam set to cut the area through the pacific.

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#4
Strebe

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The current plan is to create two hemispherical maps in Galls Stereographic, one for each page.


If these routes don’t cross oceans then I agree with using hemispheric maps or even an assemblage of continental maps. I’m puzzled by the proposal for the “Galls Stereographic” in hemispheres. Certainly you could do that, but using a rectangular projection for hemispheres seems to miss both the point of hemispheres and the point of rectangular projections. In particular, if people might be comparing lengths of routes then the Gall stereographic (or indeed any rectangular projection) would badly mislead.

Best,
— daan Strebe

#5
David Medeiros

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The current plan is to create two hemispherical maps in Galls Stereographic, one for each page.


If these routes don’t cross oceans then I agree with using hemispheric maps or even an assemblage of continental maps. I’m puzzled by the proposal for the “Galls Stereographic” in hemispheres. Certainly you could do that, but using a rectangular projection for hemispheres seems to miss both the point of hemispheres and the point of rectangular projections. In particular, if people might be comparing lengths of routes then the Gall stereographic (or indeed any rectangular projection) would badly mislead.

Best,
— daan Strebe


I think they chose Galls because of it's appearance not it's geometric characteristics. They like the way the continents look in shape and size. I'll be presenting a couple of alternatives (some compromise projection, like a Winkel Triple or a Times).

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#6
M.Denil

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Publishers like rectangular projections because the 'fill up' the page without 'wasting space'.
It is sometime a fight to stop them 'filling in' the rounded ends of a pesudo-cylindrical...

Projection choice is always a compromise, and sometimes one element involved is the shape of the space (and an individual who wants to fill that space with ink).

The Gall would likely fill the page. The presence of the binding gutter suggests using a 180° central meridian so western Africa and Europe don't fall in the gap.

The best option, however, might be to start with the route configuration pattern and see what shows that best.
A tesselation of Dymaxion triangles contigious on the routes might work, or a Goodes Homolocine....

M.Denil

#7
François Goulet

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I did an entire atlas in Gall Stereographic. The final choice was made because it was one of the projection that fitted a tabloid (11"x17") spread best...

#8
natcase

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How about a two-hemisphere map? Less orange-peely than Goode's (which is my favorite, but has limits) and it solves the problem of the between-page gutter. Azimuthal (see below) is one of your options...

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#9
Dennis McClendon

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Here's a project I did a few years ago. If you don't use three globes, some area ends up on the edge where it's hard to see. You generally need North America, Europe, and East Asia to all be clear enough to differentiate cities and countries. That's very hard to do with two globes. And two globes doesn't give the design interest or "tension" you get with three that extend outside the box.

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#10
M.Denil

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Three globes, Dennis, and you still don't show Antarctica....

A Van der Grinten has lots of visual interest, and gets things all on a page, although it best fits a page spread if you chop off the very high latitudes.




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