Jump to content

 
Photo

.tif image changes color

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1
NeverEasy

NeverEasy

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts
  • Finland

Hello!

I have a .tif image I wish to add to ArcGIS using it's original colors, but when I add it (via Add Data) they change. Something to do with the bands I guess? How do you get the original colors?

See attachment for example.

Thanks!

Attached Files



#2
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,891 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

I have a .tif image I wish to add to ArcGIS using it's original colors, but when I add it (via Add Data) they change. Something to do with the bands I guess? How do you get the original colors?

See attachment for example.


It can be that it's using indexed color, or CMYK. If that's the case, convert it to RGB before importing in ArcGIS.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#3
NeverEasy

NeverEasy

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts
  • Finland

Ok, thanks!

#4
Strebe

Strebe

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 85 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Map projections. Snobby chocolate. Science in general.
  • United States

It can be that it's using indexed color, or CMYK. If that's the case, convert it to RGB before importing in ArcGIS.


To elaborate, TIFF is a vast specification. It’s very easy to write a program to write out a TIFF file. It’s practically impossible to write a program that reads every TIFF variant because the TIFF specification allows so many things, including some customization in the format. When you run into a problematic TIFF, read it into a mainstream program that can read it properly. Make some minor change to it (particularly, fix the color space to something normal and common and modern, if it’s not already.) Then write it out again.

Good luck.
— daan Strebe

#5
frax

frax

    Hall of Fame

  • Associate Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,312 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Stockholm, Sweden
  • Interests:music, hiking, friends, nature, photography, traveling. and maps!
  • Sweden

Definately looks like it is something with the bands. Also note that ArcGIS by default applies a stretch to any raster images added, but that wouldn't look like this...

Most likely it is indexed, then you can adjust the colors/classes in the symbology, or you can convert it to RGB using e.g. Photoshop first.
Hugo Ahlenius
Nordpil - custom maps and GIS
http://nordpil.com/
Twitter

#6
greg585

greg585

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Perth
  • Australia

This happened to me but when i was clipping a raster to a vectors boundary. I just messed about with the bands until it was more similar to how it was before the clipping. Would be good to know a better way though. Will forward this to Esri




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->