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#1
burwelbo

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Hello

I just thought I would post a sample of a project I am working on. This map was created using the bump map tools in ArcMap and tree Landcover data. Really just wondering what people think of the style. Also, where would I download toponomy for the area I am mapping in the United States?

Thanks
Bruce

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#2
DaveB

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Hard to see much with the small thumbnails, but from what I can see it looks pleasing to me. Nice muted natural-looking colors.
Dave Barnes
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#3
burwelbo

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Lets try this

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#4
frax

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looks gorgeous! nice work - I would be interested in hearing more on the methodology!
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#5
DaveB

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Looking good!

The Esri Mapping Center has posted a few blog entries in the past year or two about bump mapping using ArcGIS. If you go to Esri Mapping Center and search for bump mapping, select the Blog tab and search for "bump mapping" you should find 4 blog posts about this. A couple of the posts were written by Jeff Nighbert of the BLM in Oregon, who pioneered these techniques.
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#6
burwelbo

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Dave is right. I basically used a 10 m DEM and using ArcMap, I queried out the tree data from the Landcover dataset. It was used as the pattern for the input to the model. Once the bumps were created, I added them to the DEM I had already shaded.I would like to try some different cover types to see what can be done.

No one answered my question on Toponomy. Where is the best place to get Place Names for the USA?

Thanks
Bruce

#7
sitesatlas

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The U.S. Board on Geographic Names website is the place to go for toponyms in the U.S. You can download georeferenced names by state or feature type, and there's also a search form. If you want to consult topo maps for name placement, I like to use ACME Mapper.
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#8
Clark Geomatics

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Looks really nice. The only issue I have with bump maps that are specific to trees is that it leaves (don't mind the pun) the rest of the map looking flat. Rocks, ice, etc all have texture as well and, depending on your scale, would benefit from some attention.
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#9
burwelbo

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I agree. Any suggestions on that? Should I just add more textures from the land cover classification using different shapes?

Thanks for the links to the Toponymy data.

Bruce

#10
razornole

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I agree. Any suggestions on that? Should I just add more textures from the land cover classification using different shapes?

Thanks for the links to the Toponymy data.

Bruce


What is the purpose of this map? Hiking, general reference, land use land cover. That what dictates my styles.

kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#11
burwelbo

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Its a general reference poster. Something to add to my web portfolio.

#12
Agnar Renolen

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OK, her is a little critique.

Generally a very nice shading, very Tom Patterson-ish, which I like myself.

However, what are the blue-grayish patches near the ridge tops. Glaciers? If so, make them white, with a hint of blue shade.

The water color is slightly too bright, not enough contrast against the background.

Consider a warmer and lighter color for the forest. Such a dark green provides a poor backdrop for labels and other objects in terms of legibility, even if it looks quite realistic.

Trails: I hate dashed lines with dashes and gaps of same length. Dash/Gap ratio of 3/1 or 4/1 looks much better in my opinion. Also consider a color with more contrast to the background.

Avoid placing labels on top of other objects. Try to find free space with a fairly monotone background, such as the area right ans slight lower of the camping symbol.

Agnar




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