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#1
gotbisco

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Hi Carto Talk...

I'm a journalist who recently completed a many month research and writing project, and am eyeing up cartography and map making as my next subject.

I've had a general interest in some of the design and general theories behind map making, thanks to reading Edward Tufte and writing about info graphics in the past (I wrote a longish piece on the designer Nicholas Felton). I saw the recent David Imus attention spark around the web and haven't been able to shake my interest in Cart since.

What's so striking to me is 1) how intwined map making is w/ history and nature (as societies and spaces changed so too do maps) and 2) how little people talk about maps today despite using them so often. I'd imagine that a larger percentage of people are using maps today than anytime before in history (--a question for me to more closely investigate in my research).

Anyway...this is all a long way of saying hello, and that I'm looking forward to reading more on this site and hopefully discussing the problems and successes of modern map making w/ the board.

Cheers,
Sean

#2
frax

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Hi and welcome, sounds like an interesting background!
Hugo Ahlenius
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#3
David Medeiros

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I'd imagine that a larger percentage of people are using maps today than anytime before in history (--a question for me to more closely investigate in my research).


There is no question, maps (in all their forms) have become an indispensable part of modern life and communication. With a population of over 6 billion and a massive portion of that connected via internet and mobile communication devices, maps are just about ubiquitous in modern societies. There has also never been more information to map! Through new and increased technologies we aciculate huge amounts of new locatable data very day (every second). Through smart phones and other devices, the same people who likely consume the largest proportion of modern maps are also contributing some of the biggest datasets through geo tagged tweets, photos, and trip logs. At the same time, appreciation for the value of cartographic design (as well as general geographic awareness) seems to be shrinking.

A very interesting subject! I look forward to hearing what you come up with in tour research. Welcome to CartoTalk!

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

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#4
Hans van der Maarel

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There is no question, maps (in all their forms) have become an indispensable part of modern life and communication.


In fact, some of the most basic maps I've ever made have been seen by millions of people. Base maps for rainfall data (in several regions: Netherlands, Germany, Scandinavia) on a number of websites and mobile apps. 10 years ago something like that still seemed very sci-fi.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
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#5
Jacques Gélinas

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Imus marketing approach seems to be centered a lot on the craft, the making of the map and the map maker behind the map. Because of his approach, people are taking some notice to cartography as such. I believe this is a plus for cartographers at large.

Regards,

Jacques Gélinas
cartographer
www.cartesgeo.ca





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