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#1
dsl

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These are couple of interactive maps I've been working on the last few months. They don't really have anything in common other than they were learning experiences, and all use Google Fusion Tables as a base. They use a lot of different javascript libraries: Google Maps, Protovis, Dojo, JQuery, Knockout, and Polymaps. Sorry, but these are intended to be viewed on "modern" browsers (FireFox, Chrome, and Safari, and possibly IE9).

This one was based on another visualization called "A history of the world in 100 seconds according to wikipedia". You may have seen it on Flowing Data. The author was kind enough to post all their data in a fusion table, so this was an attempt to present it in an interactive manner. I used protovis to create the timeline, and google maps for the mapping part. I realize it isn't a particularly useful interactive, but it is kind of fun to play around with. I should also qualify that it presents an English language bias view of the world (and probably Eurocentric).

This one will be of interest mostly to US citizens. It is an attempt to make a web application that allows the user to find out about their Congressional representative. Basically, the user can search for their address, or click on a district (using the select option on the toolbar) and data will load in the top dropdown. The information provides a little bio, the way the representative votes on recent bills, and their most recent financial data. The app pulls data from a lot of sources (Ny Times, open secrets etc.) Mostly it was an experiment using Polymaps and GeoJson tiles. It's not as user-friendly as I'd like, and it can be a little slow.

Finally, this one I thought worked out pretty well. It is a "health atlas" based on the CDC's BRFSS data. Sorry, only US data. I thought this loads up pretty fast, and was more user friendly that the CDC's version.

I'd be interested to hear everyone's thoughts.

Thanks!

David

#2
skorasaurus

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Sorry this is a bit brief:

Neat mashup on the timeline, I'd suggest to add the URL of the relevant wiki entry when I click on a point.

Find your congressional rep - awesome idea ! Unfortunately, I put in an [US] address and I received a box that said "an error occured [sic] while retreiving data... Please try again." :(
What library did you use to style (colors, etc) the map ? I like the design.

#3
dsl

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Thanks for the feedback!

Neat mashup on the timeline, I'd suggest to add the URL of the relevant wiki entry when I click on a point.


That is a good idea. I didn't create the base data, and unfortunately links weren't available. Here is the table if you are interested http://www.google.co...e?dsrcid=851577.

Find your congressional rep - awesome idea ! Unfortunately, I put in an [US] address and I received a box that said "an error occured [sic] while retreiving data... Please try again." :(
What library did you use to style (colors, etc) the map ? I like the design.



Sorry the address search didn't work for you. I'm using Google's api to reverse geocode the address so something must be going wrong there..

I'm using polymaps which is a really nice library for rendering maps in javascript. The background map was created through Cloudmade, and I think I just copied one of their styles available with a few modifications. I've also heard good things about leaflet, but haven't tried using it.

Cheers,
David




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