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Visualizing the Canadian Crime Severity Index

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#1
Michael Markieta

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Hi all,

I want to share an illustration that I have worked on the past couple of days which aims to display the varying degrees of Crime Severity in Canada. The data come from Statistics Canada, alongside other measures of crime, such as crime rate and volume.

http://www.spatialan...severity-index/

I hope the graphic serves is purpose without much explanation. If so, then I've done my job well.

I always support and encourage feedback, dont be shy!
I am always looking to improve my illustration and visualization skills.

Cheers,

Attached Files


Michael Markieta - www.spatialanalysis.ca
Research Assistant - Department of Geography @ Ryerson University
B.A. Candidate - Geographic Analysis
Ryerson University
Toronto, ON, Canada

#2
Hans van der Maarel

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Interesting visualisation, but it raises a few questions with me.

Most importantly: what are the numbers representing? Are they per capita or total? I think it's per capita given the fact Nunavut and Northern Territories have the largest symbols. Is "Crime Index" the total of violent and non-violent?
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#3
rudy

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Not clear what the crime index is . . . .

#4
razornole

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I'm a little lost on how to quantify the data, there needs to be some sort of key.

Think that you could also loose the "middle" line in each sector, it just gets in the way and made me think that you had six categories of data.

Think your title could be a little more clearer on what you are representing, i.e. provinces and territories?

kru
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#5
Matthew Hampton

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When I initially looked at the thumbnail of the attached image I was curious what Mercedes Benz had to do with crime? :ph34r:

I think radar-graphs can be effective at portraying crime severity - but I got a little confused when trying to make sense of this. You seem to have 3 indexes - but your visual indicator (circle) has 6 axes. I could understand the chart better if you differentiated the boundary-lines between indexes from the axes that indicate their relative value.

I also think you should make the key stand out a little more from the different provinces so your eye focusses on it first.

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#6
Dennis McClendon

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Good example of chartjunk. What you're showing is simple one-dimensional data (crimes per whatever by province), subdivided into violent vs. nonviolent. You could do this with graduated circles divided into two-slice pie charts, squares that work the same way, or this way, which I think better emphasizes the one-dimensional variable:

Posted Image

Arrange alphabetically or from most to least as you wish, or put them vertically on a simple map.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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#7
Jacques Gélinas

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I hope the graphic serves is purpose without much explanation.


Sorry it does not work for me.

Suggestion:
I would take Dennis' bar chart arrange and spread the provinces West to East vertically, place that chart above a map of Canada and draw a line from each of the bar values to the corresponding province or territory. I would then fine tune the graphic look and feel. Simple but I think then it would work (anyway I think it would for me).

Regards,

Jacques Gélinas
cartographer
www.cartesgeo.ca


#8
Michael Markieta

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Thanks for the comments and critiques everyone! Very much appreciated.

:huh: I guess its back to the drawing board...
Michael Markieta - www.spatialanalysis.ca
Research Assistant - Department of Geography @ Ryerson University
B.A. Candidate - Geographic Analysis
Ryerson University
Toronto, ON, Canada




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