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#1
Dennis McClendon

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At long last I actually have good street centerline data for Chicago, but I'm still struggling with geocoding in Arc 10. A few weeks ago I got so frustrated that I gave up and used Google Fusion Tables, which only left one out of 300 addresses unmatched. Arc left around 25 percent unmatched on first pass. Now I have a client who wants to send me 8000 addresses, and placing the dots by hand is impractical. How can I make Arc work better? Are there better batch geocoding solutions?
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#2
David Medeiros

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BatchGeo used to work for this but I think they disabled their direct export option and now all you get is a static Google map. But check it out, you may be able to extract the points as a KML from the Google Map interface or by tearing into the page code.
http://batchgeo.com/

Google Fusion Tables does an excellent job with geocoding, especially for places that don't have specific addresses (like large parks). But they specifically block export of coordinates that were geocoded in Fusion Tables (as opposed to brought in as X Y to begin with). What this means is you can view the geocoding results in the Fusion Tables map view but you can not export them with the KML from FT. If you do you will see that all geocoded points are missing or misplaced.

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#3
Hans van der Maarel

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I've used the Yahoo geocoding API, but that requires a bit of programming. Results seemed fine, never really noticed any mismatches. It does depend on how your addresses are supplied.

But check it out, you may be able to extract the points as a KML from the Google Map interface or by tearing into the page code.


I'm pretty sure I can, would be happy to give that a try.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
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#4
Tim Wallace

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At long last I actually have good street centerline data for Chicago, but I'm still struggling with geocoding in Arc 10. A few weeks ago I got so frustrated that I gave up and used Google Fusion Tables, which only left one out of 300 addresses unmatched. Arc left around 25 percent unmatched on first pass. Now I have a client who wants to send me 8000 addresses, and placing the dots by hand is impractical. How can I make Arc work better? Are there better batch geocoding solutions?


Dennis,
If you are comfortable with Python, you might try out geopy. For convoluted data sets, I have used it to geolocate addresses using Google, Bing, OSM (MapQuest serves this up) Yahoo! and others. It's nice to be able to compare results and take what you like from each source.
Tim

#5
Jacques Gélinas

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Denis,

I picked up a little piece of software (Free) called MapGeocode by Micropath corporation a while back. It took a simple csv text file and returned the lat long information. It also did reverse geocoding. It used Google maps to do the work. Not sure why but it does not seem to be on their site anymore. Maybe someone at Micropath corporation could shed some light on the reason why it is no longer available.

Regards,

Jacques Gélinas
cartographer
www.cartesgeo.ca


#6
Bryan Swindell

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And we can't forget Map-A-List, a free (for now) utility that works great, at least for what I do.

#7
juanchosierrar

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Hi Dennis

Fusion allows you to geocode tables only once direccionesa 2500, which does not mean you can not do multiple processes if they are a lot of data, you also have options if the geocoding correction has gone wrong at some point, maps to list allows you to think 8500 points and gives statistics of precision, Batchgeo 2,500, although you can start a new process and gives you precision data, scribblemaps tool that works with Google Maps and you can upload excel addresses and geocoded, MapChannels also has tools for geocoding. Almost all the programs you can download the version mentioned kml.

The important thing is you have to geocode addresses written the best you can

The following link you can find some of the programs mentioned

http://juanchosierra...h/...dificación

and here you can find many other programs geocoding.

http://groups.google...geocoders?pli=1

Sorry English is a translator.

regards

Edited by juanchosierrar, 25 August 2011 - 11:53 AM.


#8
Charles Syrett

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BatchGeo used to work for this but I think they disabled their direct export option and now all you get is a static Google map. But check it out, you may be able to extract the points as a KML from the Google Map interface or by tearing into the page code.
http://batchgeo.com/


You can easily save from BatchGeo -- just scroll all the way down. You'll find it at the bottom of the page! No tearing required. :rolleyes:

Charles Syrett
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http://www.mapgraphics.com

#9
David Medeiros

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BatchGeo used to work for this but I think they disabled their direct export option and now all you get is a static Google map. But check it out, you may be able to extract the points as a KML from the Google Map interface or by tearing into the page code.
http://batchgeo.com/


You can easily save from BatchGeo -- just scroll all the way down. You'll find it at the bottom of the page! No tearing required. :rolleyes:

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com


Ahh, so you can. Thanks. I'd stopped using them because at one point (a year or two ago) they changed their interface and eliminated the KML output. Now if Fusion Tables would just add full geocoding output to KML that would really be great.

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#10
Dennis McClendon

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So none of you are using the geocoding capability of Arc? How do you go from the KML file into Arc?
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#11
David Medeiros

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So none of you are using the geocoding capability of Arc? How do you go from the KML file into Arc?


Arc reads KML so it's a direct import (look for the KML to Layer tool in Conversion tool box). I have students who do use the Arc geocoder on a regular basis and I find it be less accurate than Google in many cases. Either less accurate or less complete, meaning Google will successfully geocode many location that Arc just skips (any feature labeled by its name and not its address for instance: parks, forests, lakes etc.).

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#12
ProMapper

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At long last I actually have good street centerline data for Chicago, but I'm still struggling with geocoding in Arc 10. A few weeks ago I got so frustrated that I gave up and used Google Fusion Tables, which only left one out of 300 addresses unmatched. Arc left around 25 percent unmatched on first pass. Now I have a client who wants to send me 8000 addresses, and placing the dots by hand is impractical. How can I make Arc work better? Are there better batch geocoding solutions?

Well here is a simple way to do it.

First go over to http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/geocoder/ and select tab option for pasting any Excel data. Now just copy the Excel Sheet, don't copy the whole of 8000 addresses in one go, I would recommend in batches of few hundreds. Once Google Engine does the geocoding, export that as GPX file.

Now reconvert the GPX file using http://www.gpsvisual...m/convert_input into a comma separated text file (CSV). So by the end of a few hours you will have 8000 addresses Geocoded.

If you want to use Yahoo geocoding engine, then just choose Yahoo engine while Geocoding, do not forget the Tab option for pasting the Excel file, the result will be displayed in the window below, select and paste in Excel sheet.

Else if you can just use the GPX file right away, I think Global Mapper and ArcGIS accept them as such.

End If :D

Anu
http://www.mapsandlocations.com

#13
wick

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Dennis,

I assume your address locator in ArcMap is set up with one data source (the street centerlines), so 25% unmatched on the first pass sounds a bit high but not unreasonable. If you chose the default match settings, those 75% that did match are likely very good matches. Many of the web services mentioned in this thread will give higher match scores because they use multiple sources to match your addresses. If it can't find an exact match with the primary database it will look at another sources such as place name database or ZIP Codes. The service might not tell you the match quality so you don't know if an address was matched by exact address or matched by center of ZIP code. Depending on your map scale that might not matter, but it can be good information to know.
In ArcMap you can usually get more matches by tuning the Geocoding Options to lower your standards of match quality. If you have other data sources, you can build address locators for them and combine them with a Composite address locator. You can set priorities and selection criteria within the composite locator to control which locators are used 1st.

At long last I actually have good street centerline data for Chicago, but I'm still struggling with geocoding in Arc 10. A few weeks ago I got so frustrated that I gave up and used Google Fusion Tables, which only left one out of 300 addresses unmatched. Arc left around 25 percent unmatched on first pass. Now I have a client who wants to send me 8000 addresses, and placing the dots by hand is impractical. How can I make Arc work better? Are there better batch geocoding solutions?


Jesse Wickizer
Maps.com

#14
Dennis McClendon

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I wanted to bump this topic to see what folks are using these days for geocoding addresses and then using the locations on services other than Google Maps or in Arc.  For a couple hundred addresses I can do a Fusion Table, screen grab from the resulting Google Map, and then trace that in Illustrator.  But there must be a better way when a client calls and wants me to spot 500 locations spread across Alabama and Georgia.

 

I do have ArcMap, but I don't do any Python or other programming.

 

GeoBatch no longer seems to offer export.  Has anyone used the service offered through Texas A&M?


Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#15
François Goulet

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So none of you are using the geocoding capability of Arc? How do you go from the KML file into Arc?

 

I use it all the time and the only way I've been able to have a better result is through address normalization, like be sure to always use, in your table to geocode and your reference (here, Tiger), street direction like N, S, E, W or North, South, East, West. 

 

You can have multiple level of geocoding. I have one with the complete address:

1: number, street, city, postal codes. 

2: number, street, city

3: intersections

4: postal codes

etc.

 

It depends of your data. Mine is from written surveys so people don't always want to give their whole addresses. 

 

If you don't need the exact location (for example, if +/- 500 ft from the exact location is acceptable), you could use zip codes.

 

In Canada, we don't have postal codes zones. I don't know if it exists in the US.

I have address points for our territory so I was able to create a minimum bounding rectangle for each postal code and then using the length property calculated in the process, select all that where 500m long or less (we work at a 250m precision). If an address has a postal code which spans for less that 500m, we assign the center x,y of the rectangle to the point to geocode and we are sure the point is 250m or less from the actual location.






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