Jump to content

 
Photo

Name that projection, anyone?

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1
dekkerb

dekkerb

    Newbie

  • Validated Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Utrecht
  • Interests:GIS for mapping in Infographics
  • Netherlands

Attached File  mapbkg.gif   6.07KB   125 downloads

Does anyone know what world-projection is used in this image?
I found it on an (abandoned) Boston University site (http://duckwater.bu.edu/).
I like how Alaska and Australia aren't squashed or skewed as much as usual; though South America and Africa seam a bit off.
Can't seem to find it in any reference book or -site. Any hints in the right direction are very much appreciated!

Bart-Jan

#2
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,870 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

Does anyone know what world-projection is used in this image?
I found it on an (abandoned) Boston University site (http://duckwater.bu.edu/).
I like how Alaska and Australia aren't squashed or skewed as much as usual; though South America and Africa seam a bit off.
Can't seem to find it in any reference book or -site. Any hints in the right direction are very much appreciated!


Hard to say from such a small image. The image appears to be centered at about 25 degrees East but it's not clear whether that's the central meridian or not, which makes searching for the correct match a bit awkward (most samples in books are either centered on 0 or 100 degrees West). I wouldn't even be able to confidently say whether it's a conical or azimuthal projection.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#3
Kalai Selvan

Kalai Selvan

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 159 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:India
  • Interests:Map Making & Map making
  • India

I think it should be lat.lon wgs84..

Attached File  mapbkg.gif   6.07KB   125 downloads

Does anyone know what world-projection is used in this image?
I found it on an (abandoned) Boston University site (http://duckwater.bu.edu/).
I like how Alaska and Australia aren't squashed or skewed as much as usual; though South America and Africa seam a bit off.
Can't seem to find it in any reference book or -site. Any hints in the right direction are very much appreciated!

Bart-Jan


Thanks and Regards
Kalai Selvan


#4
DaveB

DaveB

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,054 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Redlands, CA
  • United States

It's certainly projected and not just a simple lat/long geographic coordinate system. I tried a bunch of the world projected coordinate systems in ArcMap and it seems similar to Van der Grinten, but with more curvature/tilt in North America. None of the other world coordinate systems come close. It could be one that isn't included there or it could be something else entirely.
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek

#5
kay

kay

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 65 posts
  • Canada

I agree with DaveB. It is certainly projected. I have tried a bunch of world projections with MAPublisher. The closest one is Van der Grinten. That's is the only projection (so far) which can keep the shape of Greenland like this… Otherwise, it will be squished a bit… … but my van der Grinten map has a bit "thinner" South America than it is in the picture…. but van der Grinten is closest so far… :-)

p.s.- I like guessing projections :-) so much fun.

#6
dekkerb

dekkerb

    Newbie

  • Validated Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Utrecht
  • Interests:GIS for mapping in Infographics
  • Netherlands

To make matters worse: it could be one of those 'interrupted' projections... Impossible to trace!
Maybe I should just try and recreate it with Bernhard Jenny's Flex Projector? Might work.

Van der Grinten - close, very close! I'll look into it.

#7
kay

kay

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 65 posts
  • Canada

How about "Lagrange" map?
Take a look at those pages below:
http://members.shaw....aps/mcf0701.htm
http://www.progonos....f/projConf.html

The shape of Greenland is slightly closer to the one in your image than the one from van der Grinten...

#8
dekkerb

dekkerb

    Newbie

  • Validated Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Utrecht
  • Interests:GIS for mapping in Infographics
  • Netherlands

Update!
I don't know if anybody is going to read this anymore, but a small search with google image-search (brilliant) located several other maps in this weird projection. Obviously, they use the same exact basemap, so it might be a one-off...

http://sprojects.mmi...laria-world.gif
sourced: Canada Communicable Disease Report, March 2000 (CCRD)
Posted Image
and
http://proceedings.e...p569/p56914.gif
Posted Image

#9
rudy

rudy

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 739 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Canada

It does look like a modified Lagrange projection but not quite: see http
://www.progonos.com/furuti/MapProj/Nor.../projConf.html


In response to this topic's subtitle: Yes. We are always right.

#10
M.Denil

M.Denil

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 56 posts
  • United States

It is clearly neither Lagrange or Van der Gritten .
Nor is it interupted.

I first guessed it to be an old 'globular' projection of one sort or another; the name Nicolosi came to mind, but the sample on the Geocart site does not have the extent of this one. Too, globulars were pretty well restricted to one hemisphere...

#11
M.Denil

M.Denil

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 56 posts
  • United States

The shape of Alaska is similar to a Guyou, but the example in Snyder's "Flattening the Earth" has two hemispheres and a heavily distorted western Europe.

The whole earth shape is also very similar to the Adams 'world in a square II'
link to Adams world in a square II

Of course, the sketches shown here are not very well drawn: Northern Alaska looks quite suspect, and Baffin Bay is far too round and open. In fact, the whole Canadian Archipelago is bogus: Baffin Island is squished, Devon and Ellesmere are just jokes, and the rest of the islands have nothing to do with reality at all.

The more I look at it, the more I lean towards the Adams 'world in a square II'. The parts of the world that don't match the Geocart sample are exactly the parts of suspect drawing.

Mark Denil




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->