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Type For Maps E-Booklet!


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#1
Gretchen Peterson

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I just released my newest e-booklet called Type For Maps.

It showcases 50 fonts:
20 "system" fonts (those that are most likely to be on a GIS professional's PC OS)
20 high-quality free fonts
10 for-fee fonts

These are shown in such a way as to make it a lot easier to choose a typeface for a map project. By flipping through the booklet and looking at the sample map on each page (vectorized this time thanks to the helpful comments by CartoTalker's on my last booklet) as well as the character table, pangrams of 4 varieties of each typeface, and sample attribute hierarchy labels, it should make the decision much easier and much more informed.

I hope that everyone discovers a new typeface or two through this booklet and that those just starting out can really get a good handle on how typefaces differ and the strengths and weaknesses of each.

It is produced as a non-redistributable e-booklet in pdf format, 38 pages, $9.95. Thank you and I welcome your feedback, as always.

The entire booklet can be previewed on the purchase page here: Type For Maps.


Type For Maps

#2
oombaca

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I bought your colour for maps booklet Gretchen and have found it to be a great starting point for design, a real time saver. In a field where resources are often over priced and awkward to work with it stood out.

I look forward to trying out this new one. Do you discuss Type conventions or simply present options and examples?

#3
Gretchen Peterson

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Hello @oombaca, I'm so glad to hear that the Color booklet is saving you time! Thanks for your feedback!

The Type For Maps booklet is almost entirely options and examples and very little on type conventions.There is one page on important definitions (serif vs. sans, leading, etc.) and one page on Map Typography (readability, combinations, mood) but that is it. There are several really good books on Typography in general and one that I especially like is Thinking With Type, though it isn't map-specific.


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Fine print: As I was re-reading my original post I realize I have to make an amendment to it and might as well do it here:
Unfortunately about a week after publishing Type For Maps it came to my attention that some customers (interestingly, all were on Macs) could not see all the fonts. I won't go into all the details but I had to down-grade the map quality in order to fix the font issue. (All customers were sent the updated copy.) The reason is because I had to switch to Acrobat X Pro to convert the original file to pdf which then necessitated that I convert the maps back to raster (jpg) format. They lost a bit of crispness but it was the only way to get the file to embed all the fonts. Apparently Acrobat X Pro can't convert .emf files and that was the only vector format common between all three programs I was using.

#4
David Medeiros

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****
Fine print: As I was re-reading my original post I realize I have to make an amendment to it and might as well do it here:
Unfortunately about a week after publishing Type For Maps it came to my attention that some customers (interestingly, all were on Macs) could not see all the fonts. I won't go into all the details but I had to down-grade the map quality in order to fix the font issue. (All customers were sent the updated copy.) The reason is because I had to switch to Acrobat X Pro to convert the original file to pdf which then necessitated that I convert the maps back to raster (jpg) format. They lost a bit of crispness but it was the only way to get the file to embed all the fonts. Apparently Acrobat X Pro can't convert .emf files and that was the only vector format common between all three programs I was using.



Gretchen, do you not have Creative Suite? It would help tremendously in producing your PDF booklets to have access to AI, Acrobat Pro and Distiller. I'm curious about what programs you are using? I know Arc can output both .ai and .eps.

If you do have Illy you may want to try the "Create Outlines" option to solve the type issue. I think Arc will create symbols from type as well but I wouldn't trust its ability to faithfully maintain the font structure when converting or exporting. Converting to outlines or a symbol will eliminate font compatibility issues between operating systems and hopefully allow you to use a placed PDF instead of an image in your booklets.

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

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#5
Gretchen Peterson

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David,

Thanks, these are good ideas for next time! I don't use the Acrobat products often but definitely should be using them more. I was using Arc and unfortunately its .eps output was not going well for me. I don't know what the problem was with that. At any rate, I think the quality as it stands is high enough to showcase the font variety and allow quick and easy choices to be made - the main goals. However, I will be re-visiting your ideas when/if I add another booklet to the series. :) (InDesign also has some cool e-book reader ready features I need to explore.)

#6
David Medeiros

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Sounds good. If by any chance the issue with Arc to .eps was in the line work, like having your lines come out blocky and/or irregularly shaped it may be the DPI setting on the export dialog menu. DPI should only effect raster output but Arc has a very strange way of translating vector line work from the screen to the output file. Increasing the DPI to 1400 or more can alleviate the problem. Best of luck!

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

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