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Lanzarote map

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#1
Igor Winiarczyk

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Any feedback from the pros welcome, just playing around with basic software - and I don't have any experience with Vue or Adobe for that matter...

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#2
Charles Syrett

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Welcome to CartoTalk, Igor. First of all, if you're looking for cartographic feedback, the "how" (or what software/techniques) is secondary to what it is you are trying to communicate with the map, and to whom, and by what media. Who will be reading the map? What do you want them to see, and in what order of importance? Will they be viewing this online, or in a PowerPoint presentation (at a distance of 50 feet and for 5 seconds), or in a book, or on a wall-size map? What graphic style will be appropriate for this purpose?

If you can answer these questions, you can get some good cartographic pointers from "the pros". Without it, we can only point to whatever is non-standard for any map. For example:

1. Usually elevation tints range from dark at the lowest elevation, to light at the highest. You have it reversed.

2. In the legend, normally the highest is at the top and the lowest is at the bottom.

3. The beach symbols appear to be too small for the size of the map, and in relation to text size.

4. There appear to be colour bands and blotches in the ocean area, presumably artifacts from whatever software you're using.

5. Halos around text should be used only when absolutely necessary. Too often, they are used as a way of working around poor design decisions. Almost always, text can be made bolder, and/or background graphics (in this case, the relief) can be made lighter while still retaining visibility.

More could be said, but I'll some others a chance. :)

Charles Syrett
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#3
Igor Winiarczyk

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Thanks for the tips, I'm just starting out so the feedback obviously helps. I'm posting an different version with some improvements as per your suggestions - and to answer the question of who it's for, just a simple reference map for a tourist brochure, travel catalogue, etc..

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#4
DaveB

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I think you can do away with most (or even all) of your legend by labeling things on the map itself. For example, label the airports (presumably they have names). Spell out National Park (you can probably fit that label in if you move the El Golfo label off the land and inot the water next to its feature). Maybe label the ferry routes. Maybe add a few more spot heights.
Adjust labels. There are a number of labels for urban areas on the coasts that are currently placed mostly on the land. Those could/should be moved off of the land and into the water. There are some labels that are not clear which feature they're labeling (specifically, Puerta del Carmen and Las Playas).
There are a lot of the darker grayish shades in the legend/on the map and not much of the orange. Does the orange to black ramp have some signifigance or relation to the actual terrain?
If the extremely pixelly water is the best you can get I would drop that and just use a solid color for the water.
It took me a while to realize the graticule labels are decimal degrees and not meters or something. Why 3 decimals places? I would change it to degrees and minutes and use the degrees symbol at least.
There is more space between the features and the edge of the map at the bottom than at the top of the map.

Right now, to me this looks like a map made with lots of defaults (dare I say it? Like many GIS maps made by people who don't have the time or expertise to design a good cartographic product.) Look beyond the defaults. Think about elegant design, the intended audience and the intended message of the map. Look at maps of a similar nature, and various other maps of any type that you like, and see if you pick up anything from those.
Dave Barnes
Esri
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Map Geek

#5
Igor Winiarczyk

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Right on, thanks for the tips Dave.




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