Jump to content

 
Photo

Why ArcGIS would be a good idea

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1
Cartogirl

Cartogirl

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Canada

A co-worker and I are trying to get our company to purchase a ESRI license for the office and due to the cost our boss would like us to give reasons why this would be good for the company.
We are a Marine Survey company who uses various software but mainly seems to stick to the CAD side of things.

we have a list of reasons but would really like to beef it up some more.

Feel free to share your thoughts

Cheers

#2
François Goulet

François Goulet

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 688 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Mille-Isles, Qc
  • Interests:Cartography, History, Graphic Design and almost everything else...
  • Canada

ArcGIS is a great tool to integrate CAD data with other data, but without knowing what your actual need are, it's hard to give you reasons why ArcGIS could be a better option.

As an example, I worked for a publisher and we were making high quality maps so I ended almost everytime in exporting my maps in Illy. We had an ArcView licence and it was a great tool to maintain the database, but an open source solution would have been as good as Arc in that case.

Tell us more! :)

#3
dsl

dsl

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 225 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Denver
  • United States

Could you share some of what is already on your list?

The 3D analyst and Spatial analyst extensions are both great analytical tools and visualization tools, they have numerous interpolation routines...but that's an extra 5000 USD on top of the ArcView costs. What CAD software are you using?

Cheers,
David

Edit:

These links might be useful:
http://dusk.geo.orst.edu/djl/arcgis/
http://www.esri.com/...tion/index.html
www.esri.com/industries/marine/

You can also get an ESRI rep to come in for free to demo different solutions.

#4
Donald Milne

Donald Milne

    Newbie

  • Validated Member
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Saginaw, Michigan
  • Interests:Mapping (of course), traffic engineering, comics, history, roadtrip travel.
  • United States

As with any software purchase, it should be driven by what your needs are. What do you want a program to do for you? I've found ArcGIS is very good at combining data from different sources, creating and maintaining a database of information you want to map, mapping a wide variety of layers against each other, querying data to find relationships, creating new features within the various layers, creating maps for printing, and even converting data to other formats. I know it also does much more, especially with extensions, but this is my experience. I'm currently using it for redistricting support for political parties.

- Donald Milne
Milne Enterprises, Inc.
http://milneenterprises.weebly.com/

#5
Cartogirl

Cartogirl

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Canada

As a marine survey company we collect, process and interpret data for various reasons. (pipeline information, ice scours, offshore develepment etc) the plans that are drawn up are in CAD so Arc wouldn't typically be needed for that purpose.
However I have done some client based projects using 9.2 in the past. this was to determine which areas are most suitable for the client based on slopes, depths and bottom type.

The industry I work in is slowly turning towards GIS and therefore we are trying to encourage the same from our employers.

we have mentioned:
-the ability to overlay previous years data over that of newly collected data
-Using Arc for the creation of databases
-Arc's ability to deal with vast numbers of points etc
-opens the company up to more projects with other companies and government agencies (CHS uses Arc)

Once we convince the company to get a license I will then work on the extentions such as 3D Analyst etc.

Thanks again

Robin

#6
James Hines

James Hines

    James Anthony Hines

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 543 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Centreville, Nova Scotia
  • Interests:Cartography, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Economics, Occultism, Spiritualism
  • Canada

I'm a little concerned if you intend to use old CAD data in ArcGIS then would it not be an expensive process to georeference the data into the proper spatial referenced locations? Now assuming the ultimate goal of re-using the data so that you can properly reference it in the decimal degrees would take a lot of work. Then again I know you can still use the data without coordinates but never able to use any projection other then world or ortho in an official capacity.

For the database their are several options that can used here: if you only intend to use Access then I would highly recommend a copy of that package just in case you need to do work outside the GIS atmosphere. However that in itself is a costly way of doing things since Access costs can cost a lot of money. So the other alternatives would be to use ArcSDE which uses database technology such as SQL server, Oracle, & PostGIS. However for those of us that use Manifold whether you know or not have atleast some ArcSDE knowledge. Of course you need to create an instance, and have a schema that allows ArcSDE to read the instance in order to create a geodatabase. Depending on database package that can also be costly. Keep in mind though SQL Express is a free package which is suitable for GIS with a proper schema.

"-opens the company up to more projects with other companies and government agencies (CHS uses Arc) "

I want to point out unlike most other countries the government of Canada and for that matter most other government agencies tend to hire their own employees & tends to be unfriendly territory for freelancers. In other words chances of getting government contracts in Canada are small.

"There is much beauty that we fail to see through our own eyes teeming with life forms that give us that perception of our reality.  Leaves on the trees blowing gently in the wind, or scarily, the waves pounding through high surf, or lightly on a warm summer’s day; that opportunity to sit or swim in the water on a white beach.   That comfort to shout, “The universal conscious do you hear me?  I am alive, guide me dear logos towards the path of rightnesses.”  Earned what has been kept, no longer to be absorbed into a life filled with cold damn winds and  that stubborn fog clouding  my vision with nothing but darkness."


#7
François Goulet

François Goulet

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 688 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Mille-Isles, Qc
  • Interests:Cartography, History, Graphic Design and almost everything else...
  • Canada

I want to point out unlike most other countries the government of Canada and for that matter most other government agencies tend to hire their own employees & tends to be unfriendly territory for freelancers. In other words chances of getting government contracts in Canada are small.


Not entirely true. I know, for instance, that Quebec's topo maps are made by a contractor. My employer is also a contractor for for one of the biggest provincial agency and about 90% of all our carto work comes from them. ,

As for the CAD data in Arc, all of ours are taken on the field with a gps so once you know the coordinate system in which the points were taken, the georeference is automatic. I can't imagine people doing marine surveys using an arbitrary zero point.

So basically, Cartogirl, you'd want to do spatial analysis with Arc and for that, Spatial and 3D analyst are great tools. Maybe that's the point on which you should focus.

#8
dsl

dsl

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 225 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Denver
  • United States

I use Arc everyday, and come from a CAD background. I didn't see much on the list that couldn't be managed by AutoCAD Map 3D/Civil 3D. I'm making the assumption that is the brand you are using. If you are interested in the ArcGIS server (formerly ArcSDE) Database management, you can connected Map 3D to SQL Server and use it's spatial object type without the need of a middle piece of software. I would imagine Microstation has something similar as well...

Cad is defintitely more liberal about projections and coordinate systems. But it isn't out of the question to shift these to a known coordinate system to be used in Arc software. I would recommend getting Map3D regardless, because it can directly export to shapefiles with projections.

Cheers,
David

#9
amr mohammed

amr mohammed

    Newbie

  • New Member
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Egypt

it is more easier to work with your attributes through arcgis also if you want to integrate data from many programs like cad files kml files kmz files and more .....
more easier to select your coordinate system and gives ability to convert your drawing's coordinate systems
and also you can relate your map on arcmap through a connection with your programs such like evi back or any other program which can process your hydrographic syrvey data .
Create new Feature
Impress your old Geography Teacher




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->