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#1
Martin Gamache

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I have often seen boundaries depicted as wide transparent or overprinted ribbons (~4pt) with a hard line on one side either dashed or solid that is not transparent. I like this symbology. I am wondering what the proper way to construct it is, I understand the mechanics of it in illustrator, my question has more to do with which line lies on the actual source/surveyed boundary.

I have some national forest boundaries and some wilderness boundaries. Should the hard edge fall on the actual boundary with the ribbon on either side implying an approximate line? Or should the transparent ribbon be centered on the actual boundary.

I realise there might not be a correct answer here, but I am hoping for some opinions on what may be more approriate or convention, especially from some of the folks involved in Forest Service mapping.

Thanks.


Martin Gamache

#2
Nick Springer

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I haven't done any specific Forest Service experience, but I am willing to offer my $.02 ;)

The hard dashed line, in my opinion, should always represent the actual boundary line. The transparent ribbon is used to emphasize and/or classify the boundary.

The ribbon should usually be on the inside of the bounded region. So, if you are showing a forest area delineated from unprotected areas, the ribbon would only be one the inside.

If you are showing the boundary between two identical region types (e.g. the border between 2 states) then the ribbon would straddle the boundary equally, essentially on the inside of both areas.

If the boundary separates to regions that you want to be categorically separate (e.g. two sales territories), then the ribbon should be centered on the boundary and each side would be a different color. This could also apply to similar regions like states if you want to create a political map that emphasizes the uniqueness of each state.

Nick Springer

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Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC


#3
Hans van der Maarel

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Martin,

I agree with Nick. The hard, visible line should be the actual boundary. National Geographic is using this style a lot for country (or other administrative) boundaries.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#4
ELeFevre

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Does anyone have any visual examples we can look at? I'm a visual learner:)



#5
Nick Springer

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This is an example of the ribbon on the inside of the bounded region

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Nick Springer

Director of Design and Web Applications: ALK Technologies Inc.
Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC


#6
Nick Springer

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This is an example showing the boundary between two identical region types (internal administrative units in this case)

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Nick Springer

Director of Design and Web Applications: ALK Technologies Inc.
Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC


#7
Nick Springer

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This is an example showing the boundary separating two regions that you want to be categorically separate

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Nick Springer

Director of Design and Web Applications: ALK Technologies Inc.
Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC


#8
ELeFevre

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Thanks Nick.



#9
Claude

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and in terms of construction it would just be (in Illustrator) using the object/path/offset path function, entering a negative number to get it to offset inward.

oops, just reread your post-you already know how to do this. well, maybe it'll be helpful to someone.
Platts, a div. of McGraw-Hill
www.maps.platts.com





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