Jump to content

 
Photo

Folding Methods

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1
franciscocartographer

franciscocartographer

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 58 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Phoenix, Arizona
  • Interests:Maps, FC Barcelona, Cadiz CF, Phoenix Suns, Hiking
  • United States

Hello all.

I am planning to create a booklet of a series of maps that are 18 by 24 inches each. Can anyone give me any recommendations about any folding strategies for maps at this size?

Maybe I should stick with A standard paper size like the ISO. An A2 (16 1/2 × 23 3/8 inches) could be folded into an A4 booklet (8 1/4 × 11 3/4 inches), I guess.

Thanks in advance.
--------------------------------------
Francisco Jimenez, GISP
Senior GIS Analyst & Amateur Cartographer

My webpage

#2
Dennis McClendon

Dennis McClendon

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,084 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:map design, large-scale maps of cities
  • United States

I'm not clear what you're asking. 18 x 24 is perfect for folding to 4 x 9 to fit in brochure racks. Just fan fold (six panels) the long way, then in half top to bottom.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#3
franciscocartographer

franciscocartographer

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 58 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Phoenix, Arizona
  • Interests:Maps, FC Barcelona, Cadiz CF, Phoenix Suns, Hiking
  • United States

To be more clear and unambiguous (I hope) I did a series of maps that are 18 by 24 inches. I want to make a booklet (sort of like a small atlas) with text and these maps.
I just wanted to read some suggestions about folding strategies and what kind of editing one needs to do (in illustrator) before going to the printer.
--------------------------------------
Francisco Jimenez, GISP
Senior GIS Analyst & Amateur Cartographer

My webpage

#4
Dennis McClendon

Dennis McClendon

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,084 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:map design, large-scale maps of cities
  • United States

I'm still not clear what editing would be required. Assuming the number of copies is modest, the usual way of binding these would be with a tab glued onto the back of maps folded in quarters to 9 x 12:

Attached File  mapfold.GIF   2.11KB   460 downloads

These folded leaves can then be interspersed with 9.5 x 12 pages that include text.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#5
franciscocartographer

franciscocartographer

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 58 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Phoenix, Arizona
  • Interests:Maps, FC Barcelona, Cadiz CF, Phoenix Suns, Hiking
  • United States

That is probably the best approach. I just saw an example of this on a street atlas.

Thanks!
--------------------------------------
Francisco Jimenez, GISP
Senior GIS Analyst & Amateur Cartographer

My webpage

#6
Rick Dey

Rick Dey

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 302 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Santa Rosa, CA
  • Interests:Illustrator, MAPublisher, GIS, Street Maps
  • United States

The place to start on a project like this is with a printer or bindery that can do folding of this type AND can handle binding with special inserts like the folded maps. They can let you know what needs to be taken into consideration. Sometimes a small dimension change can make a huge difference in cost. The production reps should be more than willing to work as a partner with you to make the project work best for both you and them. You may want to contact a couple to get some ideas as to cost vs. quantity also.
Rick Dey

#7
franciscocartographer

franciscocartographer

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 58 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Phoenix, Arizona
  • Interests:Maps, FC Barcelona, Cadiz CF, Phoenix Suns, Hiking
  • United States

Yes you are right, rjdey.
Contacting a printer about this should be the most practical solution.

Thanks.
--------------------------------------
Francisco Jimenez, GISP
Senior GIS Analyst & Amateur Cartographer

My webpage

#8
Rick Dey

Rick Dey

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 302 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Santa Rosa, CA
  • Interests:Illustrator, MAPublisher, GIS, Street Maps
  • United States

I'm a firm believer of consulting the various parties involved in production as early as possible in the design process. Its amazing how much grief could be saved by early planning. During one of my previous career incarnations I was the production manager for a printer that did a lot of maps and packaging. Far too many people don't realize that a 28 x 40 press cannot print all the way to the edges of that sheet.
Rick Dey

#9
Sylvie

Sylvie

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
  • Mexico

...18 x 24 is perfect for folding to 4 x 9 to fit in brochure racks.  Just fan fold (six panels) the long way, then in half top to bottom.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Why is it standard to fan-fold first the long way? Is it a limitation of the folding machine?

I usually end up refolding the map the opposite way, in particular with larger maps (such as AAA or forest service maps).
Sylvie Amezcua White
TerraPen GeoGraphics

#10
DaveB

DaveB

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,058 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Redlands, CA
  • United States

Why is it standard to fan-fold first the long way?  Is it a limitation of the folding machine?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


One reason is if you fold in half first and then fan fold (aka accordion fold) you are usually more likely to get wrinkles in the folds.

A secondary reason is folding machines are more likely to have more folding plates in the first unit.

But it's not hard and fast. You can find specialist binderies and/or larger binderies who have different capabilities.
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->