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Indistinct Natural Boundary - Best representation technique?

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#16
Laura Miles

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Well, there ya go...guess I should have looked at the whole thing. :)

#17
ravells

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I tried various glows, glows with dissolves etc (looked wrong for this sort of map), tried hatchures (looked confusing), tried a low opacity colour overlay of the whole area with a feathered edge (looked horrid) the two that worked best to my eye were a diagonal hatch (you'll have more flexibility than me by being able to put the text on top) with a glow to the text or with the text erasing the hatch pattern (I've put in a couple of sample labels), or a mid opacity large dot dash line.

Here is the hatch (I guess if you wanted to emphasise the vagueness you could feather the hatch edge as well, but the hatch edge looks vague enough to my eye as it presently stands)

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#18
ravells

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And here is the dot dash line

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#19
snowgage

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Hi Josh!

Looking good so far... I like the idea of using "ghosting" over parts of the map that are not the focus. Here, you could mask everything beyond the GYE boundary with a transparent white or beige, and just have it fade away at the GYE boundary. You should be able to keep the transparency high enough such that the features underneath are legible, especially with such contrasty symbology. Sounds like that wasn't working for you though. Another option would be to have a look at HUC boundaries and see if you can define the GYE that way; then, pair up the HUC-based boundary with a faint hillshaded terrain model underneath it all. That might have a neat look to it.

Cheers!
-B


Thanks Bryan.. I used the ghosting approach in an early version. I liked the look but the clients wanted the other areas to be as prominent and not masked. I imagine I'd get the same feedback if I went with the color inside the GYE and B/W outside..

cheers,

Josh

#20
snowgage

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I tried various glows, glows with dissolves etc (looked wrong for this sort of map), tried hatchures (looked confusing), tried a low opacity colour overlay of the whole area with a feathered edge (looked horrid) the two that worked best to my eye were a diagonal hatch (you'll have more flexibility than me by being able to put the text on top) with a glow to the text or with the text erasing the hatch pattern (I've put in a couple of sample labels), or a mid opacity large dot dash line.

Here is the hatch (I guess if you wanted to emphasise the vagueness you could feather the hatch edge as well, but the hatch edge looks vague enough to my eye as it presently stands)


Looks neat but way too busy with the myriad of ownership (IMHO)..

cheers,

j

#21
ravells

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I tried various glows, glows with dissolves etc (looked wrong for this sort of map), tried hatchures (looked confusing), tried a low opacity colour overlay of the whole area with a feathered edge (looked horrid) the two that worked best to my eye were a diagonal hatch (you'll have more flexibility than me by being able to put the text on top) with a glow to the text or with the text erasing the hatch pattern (I've put in a couple of sample labels), or a mid opacity large dot dash line.

Here is the hatch (I guess if you wanted to emphasise the vagueness you could feather the hatch edge as well, but the hatch edge looks vague enough to my eye as it presently stands)


Looks neat but way too busy with the myriad of ownership (IMHO)..

cheers,

j



Hmm, it does look too busy...I guess you could lower the opacity and change the blend mode to something which would take the background colours, like overlay....but anyway, that's the best I can come up with! Good luck with your solution!

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#22
Dennis McClendon

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I would consider changing that to Native American Reserve.


I'm curious. Why would you suggest that?
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#23
spg

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You could try a hash line symbol approach to give an indistinct width to the boundary.

#24
snowgage

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Thank you everyone for your great feedback.. I ended up taking a very simple approach and using a thick, transparent, dashed line..

cheers,

Josh

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#25
David Medeiros

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I think that's just right. Looks good.

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#26
Dennis McClendon

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I did a talk at NACIS about five years ago on indistinct boundaries and I'm trying to find the slides I made.

I like a dotted line for such boundaries, or a dashed line with very thick line weight but very short dashes, or a stipple pattern. For one thing, these are line styles we are not used to seeing on traditional topo or other maps, so they help to communicate that they are unlike the usual, more precise boundaries:

Posted Image
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#27
ravells

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Good choice, snowgage, although I have to say I do like Dennis's dots!

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#28
CentralAmericaExpe

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I'd never realized just how large the GYE was till I read through the USGS data on the subject:

http://rockyweb.cr.u...l/gye/area.html

The area is made up of approximately ~~ 35 spatial data layers, and encompasses the territory of 3 or 4 states.

This is how I'd approach it (from scratch):

-obtain all the spatial layers (in SHP file format) from the USGS;
-using an open source SHP file reader, open and merge all the layers, and save as DXF for Illustrator ingest;
-open the newly merged GYE layer over a US State vector line map & make GYE layer 50% transparent, and
remove all border coloring;
-add drop GYE layer shadow if you want (but not necessary)

Concluding, you'll have a precisely delineated GYE as of the date of last USGS SHP file edit. To make the map
really fancy, find a DTM (digital terrain model HGT file from the shuttle mission SRTM 3 arcsecond dataset); ingest the HGT file using the open source software: VTBuilder (VTB) http://www.vterrain.org), and output the file as a raster dataset that Illustrator can handle (Tiff for example), import the Tiff into Illustrator, allign with the GYE layer, and use
the GYE layer's transparent color to "colorize" the underlying terrain model, then finally, tone down the Tiff terrain
layer so that it does not overpower the objective of the map.

How does that sound?

*I know the project is finished; perhaps others will find the above useful...

Derek-
"I do recognize risk, and having recognized risk, I spend a lot of time minimizing it." Tim Severin




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