Jump to content

 
Photo

Cartographic Standards for Bathymetry

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1
Amy Smith

Amy Smith

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Roseville, California
  • United States

Hello!

I was wondering if anyone happened to know of any cartographic standards for bathymetry, in particular for inland features such as rivers and estuaries.

Thanks!

Amy

#2
David Medeiros

David Medeiros

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,082 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Redwood City CA
  • Interests:Cartography, wood working, wooden boats, fishing, camping, overland travel, exploring.
  • United States

I know there are typical hypsometric tints used in general purpose reference maps showing under water topography. These usually go from very light blue to darker and darker blues with increased depth. Some scientific depictions of underwater relief use a full color band. I tend to like the style NOAA charts often use with bathymetry broken into steps like above water contours, the shallowest step is usually a dark blue and goes to light blue or white as depth increases. Tidal elevations (exposed at low mean tide but typically considered "under water features") are shown in an off green/blue that does not conform to the rest of the color spectrum used for depths.

I'd suggest looking around at various maps to see what others are doing and pick the method you like best or best works for your subject.

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#3
Amy Smith

Amy Smith

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Roseville, California
  • United States

Thanks for the advice, David. I also like the style NOAA uses for bathymetry.

I know there are typical hypsometric tints used in general purpose reference maps showing under water topography. These usually go from very light blue to darker and darker blues with increased depth. Some scientific depictions of underwater relief use a full color band. I tend to like the style NOAA charts often use with bathymetry broken into steps like above water contours, the shallowest step is usually a dark blue and goes to light blue or white as depth increases. Tidal elevations (exposed at low mean tide but typically considered "under water features") are shown in an off green/blue that does not conform to the rest of the color spectrum used for depths.

I'd suggest looking around at various maps to see what others are doing and pick the method you like best or best works for your subject.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->