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Salmon Hatchery Map

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#1
eyemadedis

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Carto-Sensai's

First, I'm a long time fan of this site for inspiration, discussion, and knowledge. Its really a great resource!
Second, I've been meaning to post my work for sometime, and the good news is I'm finally ahead of the deadline.

The attached map will be included in a Peer Reviewed Publication with about 10 co-authors. Its meant to act as an opening, figure 1, for the current state of hatchery production in the North Pacific. I''ll have another 5 maps that will frame the regional discussion. Here is the Text that will be associated with the map:

Figure 1. Map of the North Pacific region depicting location (red points) and magnitude (scaled pie charts) of hatchery releases of Pacific Salmon during 2005. A breakdown of releases by nation and species are provided in the map inset. Data sources include a State of the Salmon database and records maintained by the North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission.

I'll leave the discussion there (for now), but I look forward to your feedback to continue this conversation.

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#2
razornole

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Hello Eyemadedis,

I think that the map has an identity crisis, is it thematic or reference? I know that it is a little bit of both with the hatchery locations and country production, but I feel it is too much reference for a thematic map. Why use a hillshade, and more importantly a hypsographic tint (or texture I can't tell what the difference colors represent within each country). It add confusion that isn't needed. Why not a standard choropleth base map for hatchery releases by nation?

I think that a legend would help with your proportional symbols. It is a stretch for people to pull the colors from you bar chart, particularly with Cherry Salmon. What color is that, black? If so every proportional symbol has several slivers of Cherry Salmon b/c you have used ;black line to separate them.

You use proportional symbols, but I can't find anything that explains what the proportions are, i.e. the range grade. Why are some circles larger then others?

You divide some nations into geographic regions, but give me no indication of where those regions are.

You use abbreviations like S.E. and S.W., I will have to assume that stands for Southeast and Southwest which is one word and not two. I wouldn't use abbreviations at all, and if I did I would keep it constant. Why North Coast B. C. and Southern British Columbia.

Hope this helps and thanks for sharing,
kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#3
MapMedia

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Excellent map!

At first glance this looks like a poster session map, not something placed in a report. A few minor tweaks will make it more suitable for a peer review report though...

1. Lose relief and tinting and rivers. Maybe choose a two tone pastel - tan for land, pale blue for oceans
2. Add national boundaries
3. Shade out nations not part of analysis (white or light gray?)
4. Place histogram vertically and directly on nation with number at top, reference this in legend
5. Bigger text for species release labels
6. Lose the 3D effects on histograms and pies
7. In legend, left justify captions, not center.

Overall, my suggestion is to have a more minimalistic approach to this map to keep the stats at the forefront and the geo-references to these stats in the background (two tone or grayscale, and partially transparent) and choose a clean color palette for the charts.

Bets of luck! Chris

#4
Charles Syrett

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I agree with the above remarks about the elevation and bathymetry, unless there's a specific reason that you included those (such as a reference in the report to land and underwater relief). The reason for the rivers is also obscure; the fact that only specific rivers are shown implies some purpose.

You should consult some references about cartographic conventions for naming of features. "Pacific Ocean" looks like it's referring to the Aleutian Trench. Imhof's "Positioning Names on Maps" is the classic reference tool.

Charles Syrett
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http://www.mapgraphics.com

#5
Gretchen Peterson

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Thanks for posting! I think that if you do a few of the things mentioned above the map will come out even better. I think losing some of that background detail will allow the hatchery locations to pop out a bit more. Also, you may want to think of something besides pie charts - although one still sees them regularly there are those that feel pie charts aren't the best way to represent data (see Few's discussion on pie chart's in his paper titled Save The Pies For Dessert.)

#6
eyemadedis

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Thanks All!

Well what a wealth of information, I'm trying desperately to stuff it all into my brain. I'll be sure to update this topic with the final map whenever I get around to finishing it. But first here are my responses to your suggestions/questions.

This map is following a conference where I made 5 posters at the regional level. This partly explains the topographic shading of the terrain and the thematic/reference issue. The others were very much intended to well have that identity crisis you pointed out.

The presence of the rivers, both larger and tributary, is data that is key to the interpretation of the map. Some of the larger rivers are specifically addressed in the paper, and the tributaries help put in perspective which areas have a lot of hatcheries and which watersheds have few.

The Bathemetry data also provides an interesting conversation point because the further, deeper, darker blue, you get away form land the less is known about the interactions of pacific salmon. The lighter shelf area is of particular interest for salmon migration/wild-hatchery interactions.

Thanks again for all other reference info and cartographic ideas
Josh

#7
Philarch

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Hi,
I think many of the cartography and color questions have been touched on, but I wanted to address the data display. Proportional symbols are a good choice, but your pie charts have no reference. I would either label the largest "piece" of each chart by millions of fish, or maybe consider a simple scatter plot showing #of hatcheries per region vs. millions of fish released per region (in sum), which could be included as a supplement in the paper. See Tufte's "Visual Display of Quantitative Information" for a good guide. Also check out Wild Salmon Center's "Atlas of Pacific Salmon" for some really great maps.InfoRain Atlas of Pacific Salmon
Additionally, a slightly smaller scale and geographic projection (rather than Mercator) with graticules might make for a bit easier orientation in the region.
Hope that helps!




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