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Attention: platemaker users

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#1
Maisie

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I have so many brown spots on the back of my hands that they are beginning to coalesce.
I have been diagnosed with cataracts, though I'm supposed to be too young for them.

For twenty-odd years ago I used a platemaker with UV lamps. It was a small company that bought the thing used--an old model without the shielding of later ones. Now I'm wondering if any other former platemaker users also have these aftereffects. (I'm not looking to sue anybody, just curious.)

There are way more brown spots (you may call them 'age spots,' I prefer to think of them as 'experience freckles') on the back of my left hand than my right--I pushed the vacuum frame into the light with the left hand.

I am too young to look this old--can I blame it on the machine?

#2
SteveR

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Dear Maisie,

It sure sounds like it to me. The obvious thing to do from here is to take better care of yourself. This applies to the rest of us as well.

In the early 1970s the great rocket scientist Werner von Braun spoke at my university. The Apollo moon project was ending and he was trying to drum up support for development of a supersonic transport plane. This project was enthusiastically opposed by environmentalists. One of the arguments they used was that the exhaust from these planes could destroy the ozone layer in the stratosphere and cause an increase in skin cancers. Von Braun's response to that argument was, if they're really serious about skin cancer they should close down the bathing beaches.

It's an unfortunate fact of life that young people do not consider the ultimate consequences of their actions. That's why the army sends them to take out a machine gun nest. That's why they buy cigarettes. That's why they go to beaches, open air swimming pools, and tanning salons. I wear long sleeve shirts and try to stay out of the sun, but when I was younger I had plenty of exposure to the sun and to chemicals now proven toxic, including asbestos, mercury, carbon tetrachloride and chlorothene. At the time I didn't see a problem because they seemed harmless enough at the time.

If you encounter a nudist who looks like he's 80 years old and ask him how he got to be so old without coming down with skin cancer, you may be surprised when he asks you, "You think 40 is old?"

Steve




#3
Soocom1

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I used a UV lamp device in a major manufacturing company making RF filters for cellular phones. (I won’t mention the name, but famous for the “Bat Wings” logo.)
That was something I experienced also, but to a much lesser degree. I have some age spots on my forehead, including one that is genetic. But yeah, I agree… Sending in young ones to do dirty work. Nice way to cull the ol’ people herd eh?
Architects design things,
Engineers build things,
and Cartographers tell them where to go.




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